Thursday, March 13, 2014

six shooter

SIX SHOOTER

Sometimes its just too embarrassing, the wailing and gnashing of teeth, “Sweet Lord Baby Jesus, help me, help me Jesus. The forces of evil are upon my house! Demonic voices, whispering to me that I must abandon your righteous tools, my instruments of retribution, Jesus! How shall I serve as your servant in Heaven without my semi-auto battle rifle to smite your enemies? How? If two spawn of the darkest pits descend upon me, they shall overcome my abilities to reload!!!!! You’re killing me Jesus! And the ammunition? When shall you deliver upon us unlimited quantities of copper ore to go along with that wonderful fracking oil?”, at which time of course I have to cut off that nonsense. How much can you listen to, right? Look, I know there is a very minor portion of the population who can exercise fire control under the stress of combat. One percent, perhaps? Most of us ain’t natural born warriors. Stress is a chemical reaction and you CAN”T control it. Repetitive muscle drills are just a way of alleviating the problem. Instead of marching into combat with false hopes and expectations, realize your limitations. Of both you and your equipment. You will spray and pray with a semi and in very short order your ammunition supply will be depleted.

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So, inevitably, the concern is raised about a situation you find yourself in where a single shot bolt action rifle won’t cut it. A vicious pack of wolves or rabid dogs attack. A combat team surrounds you. This of course ignores reality. You think that this is a Bruce Lee movie and our noble hero thwarts attacks which occur one after another rather than simultaneously. Dogs hunt in packs and are very good at it, front and rear attacks at the same time. I submit to you that a semi isn’t going to make a huge difference there, but since I’m obviously mean and uncooperative by taking a big steaming crap on your fantasies, let’s say I’m wrong. You can still have your cake and eat it too, retaining the scarce expensive ammunition saving qualities of a bolt action rifle and at the same time having a back-up semi handgun for those tight spots where you need more instant firepower. Carry a revolver as your back-up.

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I know you want an auto handgun. But you will soon be using reloads and autos are a bit picky with those. A jammed auto is no advantage. Plus, as much as you love semi-auto action, you can’t be totally indiscriminate with your ammunition supply. You must conserve to some degree, and six rounds at close range is really all you need for life and death. Eighteen rounds in an auto is just suppressive fire. And I’ll remind everyone that the original favorite auto was only seven rounds anyway, a mere one round advantage over the revolver ( other advantages are no mags to buy, always ready to fire and perfect for novices ). The revolver worked great for generations in combination with single shot rifles.

END


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30 comments:

  1. Indeed. The revolver still king on this house. Anything you can do with the .45 my 44 Spl. can do better. If the .357 mag, Is good just imagine what you can do with the .44 magnum. It will excel any expectations above the limits of the other calibers. .44 magnum is the king. All others are just followers.
    Something like you. You're the king and all the others are just followers.

    Your minion.

    Phill Herrpanties.
    Austria

    ReplyDelete
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    1. Okay, this time the name really tickled my funny bone.

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  2. Good one Jim

    YKW
    MM

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  3. There is a nice lady that might disagree with you on this one. She emptied the revolver into the close range(her and the kids were hiding in a closet and he opened the door) invader and he STILL was not dead. She hit 5 of 6. Had she an auto, I think they would have sent the body bag and not the cops to arrest him. I would have preferred the former to the latter but she did not have the tool necessary for the situation. This was a case of only one perp. Had there been another, she would have been unable to defend her children and herself. Reliability is great until it is insufficient for the job.

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    Replies
    1. And there are stories of 45's not being sufficient. Ya gotta play the odds in picking a tool.

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  4. Good post. I like my 40s for concealment and 13+1 capacity but have acquired 2 357 mag revolvers for back ups. I have found it difficult to get 357 ammo though.

    The higher power revolvers often are too heavy and bulky to carry concealed. Their major drawback in my opinion. Reloading is not bad if it is a model that adapts well to speed loaders. My Dan Wesson does not but the Ruger does. Practice with them to get fast. I carried a revolver my first couple years as a cop. Google "Revolver speed shooting" or the like. Some of those guys make it sound like a machine gun burst with faster reloads than an auto.

    If all you have is a revolver work on your other priorities. An auto pistol should not be to high on the list. I only have mine because one was my retirement "Gold watch" and the other we had the option to buy when the PD upgraded.

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    1. Is the 38's still plentiful ( relitively speaking of course )?

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    2. The 38 is spotty. Ive only seen it once in the past year at Wally world and bought what i could. Thats another plus for the 357 is you can use 38 ammo. Ive found it on line but its $1 a round. WTF?

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    3. I can't understand the pistol ammo at rifle prices, myself

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  5. Well Jim, there you go again.

    Your obsession with/against semi-auto firearms strikes me as something you pull out of your hat (ass?) whenever you get lazy and don't feel like exerting the energy to do something creative with the day's topic.

    "You will spray and pray with a semi and in very short order your ammunition supply will be depleted."

    Okay. If you are faced with enough adversaries that you're going to deplete your ammo supply, your goose is pretty much cooked whatever you're packing.

    "The revolver worked great for generations in combination with single shot rifles."

    Hey buddy, you do the single shot rifle and revolver thing. More power to you. Here's an ammo-conserving suggestion for you. Get rid of that wasteful multi-cartridge Enfield of yours in favor of a muzzle loader. Supplement that with a good old 1858 cap and ball revolver and voila' - you're all set to fend off anything that comes your way while conserving the heck out of your ammo supply.

    Hopefully, whatever might come your way won't consist of anything more than some raider armed with a muzzle loader and an 1858 cap and ball revolver.

    Seriously Jim, enough with the semi-auto hating. It sounds for all the world like you're trying to convince yourself, or at least justify a pretty indefensible (pun intended) position.

    Or more likely, my first impression was on target (pun intended again).

    But hey, you got me to respond again.

    ReplyDelete
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    1. As I wrote in the Gun Porn Apoc book ( free in the back articles if you can't afford a buck ), I do indeed love semi's. Some more than others. I'd prefer semi's. They are merely the wrong tool for post-apoc.

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  6. Yes! More revolver love for your loyal minions! Please - more revolver articles, Lord Bison.

    Sure, they can develop problems, like any good firearm. But the likelihood of them jamming or having some kind of wardrobe malfunction compared to a semi-auto is much less (and spare me the schlock around the reliability of those Austrian things. Shooting them is like firing a cuisinart, or driving a Prius).

    I love the reliability of my .357 and the flexibility to be able to handle the more forgiving .38 round too (ahem - forgiving on the shooter...not necessarily the target).

    As our Lord Bison mentioned, of course I do own the one and true semi-auto pistol. But I shoot it and own it because I love my country, and for status points with my white trash irregular peers, and to get chicks. I love it dearly, but I abhor the idea of having to buy magazines (especially the more expensive good ones) for it.

    Although I cant compete with Mr. Herrpanties when it comes to his .44 caliber, I do like the fact that my small-framed girlfriend does not break her wrist when she fires .357. My revolver is a family affair.

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    1. Simplification has its own rewards. Yes, it carries penalties. What doesn't?

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    2. @ Rottenclam:

      She must be a very petite person for not being able to handle a 44 revolver loaded with .44 specials. My daughter which, she is 12 years old, been handleing my .44 since she was 10 years old and never complains how hard it is. It must be in the mind that a big revolver will have recoil. It's not so .44 specials are the same weight of 45 acp and far superior to 38 spl. with lesser recoil.
      Don't be afraid and just try it !!.

      Rosie O'Kunt
      Ireland

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    3. I dislike the recoil of the lever action compared to my Enfield. I think everyone is going to be differant.

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  7. Sacrilage Jimbo !
    My secret friend sold me a Mini-14 never been shot, a thousand rounds of .223 and a nice 3x9 scope with 4 mags......$600 total !
    When ya gots friends like that a guy just can't refuse
    BTW I carry a Ruger 45 colt as a wheel gun for my back up weapon when hunting.
    On the other hand...without rule of law...I'll be packin my Sig 220 lol

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    1. Imagine what you could sell that arsenal for. Double, easy.

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    2. Sorry, to clarify, the Mini and ammo, not the revolver.

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    3. Sorry, I buy weapons to keep, never to sell....
      Yup me and the revolver will never part.

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    4. A little part of me died when I've sold weapons. But I ended up with improvements. Sell the Mini, buy a bolt 223, you almost end up with all of it free.

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  8. There are two different things to prep for.
    You are right about the near useless nature of the fully or semi auto to an individual prepper in the P.O.D.A.
    However, DURING the initial collapse and die off the ability to cause mass death will be highly useful, and the need for a semi-auto will likely exist if you are too close to any sort of population center.
    Afterward for as much as a generation or two a single shot rifle will be a useful hunting and self defense weapon - but so would a good archery setup...
    So which is more important to prep for?
    Both obviously - but since getting both can be prohibitive $ wise, buy the best solution you can get up front, and use it to get the missing stuff during the die off.
    Short term longer term it all matters, but slamming on the Auto all the time just tells us you are looking so far out you might miss the snake at your feet.

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    1. I agree, I am looking a bit longer out than immediate die-off. And I agree that this could be a shortcoming. I also think it would be cheaper to move away from an urbanized area than to buy a semi arsenal. Of course, granted, it ain't as easy as it used to be to give up a job and find another. But certainly easier that than fighting so many people come the time.

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    2. "And I agree that this could be a shortcoming. I also think it would be cheaper to move away from an urbanized area than to buy a semi arsenal."

      I think that's a healthy approach to have James.

      If one has to have a Semi-Auto to justify all of the firefights that one shouldn't be getting in to, then I cannot expect the life expectancy of such a person to be of any length? (Not intended as a snub on Grey in any way).

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    3. No one size fits all and there are very good reasons why you might not want to leave the city ( family, etc. ). That was why I stayed so long. However, things are a heck of a lot scarier now than then.

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    4. It only takes 1 firefight with more than one opponent to ruin your day. The supposedly 'trained' LEO's tend to hit only about 1 in 5 or 6 shots they fire. The military is even worse unless you count heavy munitions or snipers. And most civilians who engage in fire fights do just about as well as the cops or a little worse. So six shots to hit one enemy, My 15 shots should handle 2.5 perps before reloading and the same with the next magazine. Your revolvers 6 shots should get 1 then you need to reload. Reloading under the stress of a fire fight? hmmm....with enough training and the right equipment I suppose.
      Me? I am prepped for the _die off_, and just starting prepping for the PODA-
      the rifle I purchase will likely be a one shot because of the range I will be able to us it at- (easily 10+ miles clear visibility for my BOL.)- and with a scope will be able get *lots* of shots at an enemy before they can close with me to use a carbine semi auto effectively.
      So environment, skills, training, and $ are all reasons to choose one platform over another. Since the cheapest revolver I was able to find run about 200+ and the cheapest reliable semi pistols were about 400 I got the semi pistols and am certain that I am happy with the purchase,
      Now I even lived for a while in an environment that a carbine might make sense (heave to moderate forests) and where making semi auto would also make sense (lots of population within a relatively short trip away) - I left that area in part because of the survivability issue due to excess population.

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  9. “A little part of me died when I've sold weapons. But I ended up with improvements. Sell the Mini, buy a bolt 223, you almost end up with all of it free.”

    One of my biggest regrets of all time, was to sell my Ruger .357 Service Six, and my Redhawk .44 magnum. I aquired those wonderful guns way back when they were practically being given away by todays gun prices.

    I never put anything but light magnum loads, or specials through the .44, and only fired the .38 specials through the Service Six.

    The Service Six, as one might guess, was a a police issue .357. It had a 4” barrel with fixed sights, and was quite compact for a .357. Though one would guess that putting the .357 loads through that compact gun would have been somewhat unpleasant? I sold the Service Six as an excuse to pick up a Ruger P95DC 9mm semi-auto. I don't regret getting the 9mm, but would have done so without getting rid of anything if I had to do over.

    I have almost exclusively owned Ruger handguns. I do not like the looks of the Single Actions (Aside from my 50 year old Single Six, and the Vaqueros) But they are really strong and dependable handguns.

    God bless that sellout cocksucker Bill Ruger!

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  10. Your well reasoned arguments are becoming almost religious in tone. Proof to any evidence.

    The general movement, against a lot of resistance, in combat has been toward more automatic fire: not less. The people with the automatic weapons are more effective.

    There are a number of reasons to own a bolt action rifle. But you are too strident.

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    1. I hoper to partially answer this in tomorrows article. Keep keeping me on the straight and narrow. I start believing my own BS we are all in trouble.

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  11. Well done Mr. Dakin - good common sense toolage those revolvers. No magazines to get lost or damaged. My old Ruger single actions keep ticking and ticking. The Blackhawk convertibles are worth investigating, especially the .357 / 9mm combo, there is a lot of built in versatility there.

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