Thursday, February 20, 2014

skills v stockpiles

SKILLS V STOCKPILES

As we have talked about before, you can’t always expect skills to suffice alone. The English colonists who were dropped off on the shores of some very lush and bountiful lands with farming implements and not much more than a conviction that God loved them alone above all others ( in the words of The Blues Brothers “We’re on a mission from God. We can’t fail” ) and a couple of barrels of weevil filled flour probably wished that they came over on a bigger ship and that it had a few more supplies. But that’s how they rolled back then. Today, amidst teeming masses of oxygen wasters and useless eaters, sits formally fertile soil which might look lush but most likely won’t be too bountiful. If you actually could wrest a few sickly looking asparagus from the soil, sure as shooting some asswhore would either try to steal it during the night or burn you out of your hut so he could stick you in the ribs with his stainless steel Chinese paring knife tipped broom handle spear and then have both long pork stew and a side of vegetables. One of the first instructions in the White Trash Irregular Warfare Manual is to have enough food stockpiled to survive the die-off and then and only then emerge to start farming or herding for your sustenance.

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We were just speaking of myths and self-sufficiency is one of the most dangerous ones. No one that relies on any metal is really self-sufficient. A few folks can smelt their own ore, but most of us have neither the army to protect that ground, the knowledge to do so nor the near surface deposits that used to be there AND the needed fuel to forge anything. My point is, you can’t be self-sufficient. So why fight stockpiling? Granted, no matter how much you have eventually it runs out. And your descendents need a renewable source. But you don’t need a renewable source NOW. It can wait til after the Apocalypse, assuming you have adequate supplies to see you through. Most homesteading now, today, is both silly because the bank owns your land and its improvements for decades and you need a functioning economy to get it out of hock, but also come the die-off it is a proverbial magnate for trouble ( with some certain exceptions- but mainly it does take a village to raise a farm and you need to feed a lot of those that will help you. Most of us can’t afford the hidden in the wilderness farm nor one large enough to feed its defending army ).

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By ONLY stockpiling, and not undertaking the mandatory Proper Survivalist task of buying a farm, you must fight the myth that feeds this false assumption. Farms are a dime a dozen when you can fight for them, and history is full of deeds changing hands by the sword. Just as you can own a pretty assault weapon after you kill for it, so too a farmstead in the location of your choice. Meanwhile, got wheat?

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13 comments:

  1. meanwhile,got a wheat grinder?

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    1. Two or three, as they are only $25 each ( Corona from Amazon )

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    2. Corona is too much shipping. Try this one:
      http://www.amazon.com/Premium-Quality-Grinder-Wheat-Grains/dp/B000U5NZ4I/ref=sr_1_1?s=home-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1392923839&sr=1-1&keywords=wheat+grinder

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  2. I will take your theory even further back to the stone age. There were certain areas where high grade stone could be found. I have found what are called preforms that are large partially worked stone that the natives had left stockpiled near a camp area and source of water. This stuff doesn't exist at the coast so even back then they were trading stone or coming to get it them selves. If you can't stockpile it is a good idea to scout around and find out where there is lots of what you will need. Coal, salt, sheet metal, sorghum seed (imagine being the only producer of sweetener), draft animals (be prepared to keep someone from eating them), and well the list goes on and on but I wouldn't worry about stockpiling batteries, learn to live with out stuff like that.

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    1. If you use the $1 solar garden lights you can have years if not a decade plus without the need for so many candles. Seems like a very wise $20 investment.

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    2. Yes that is a great idea, I wonder if they are all about the same.

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    3. Well, they are all made in China, so they might mostly be all crap. It is a gamble, but a relitively inexpensive one ( one, BTW, NOT my idea but from minions )

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  3. Most of the folks that came here, also had indentured servants that would actually do the work for them. Of course they had plenty of land to give them after they did seven years of work, not the best, but it would do. I wrote the paring knife idea down, but have one question, do you just tape the whole dang thing to the stick, or remove the handle and make a slot in the stick to hold it?

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    Replies
    1. I think if you are using a contraption like this, anything other than duct tape is beyond you.

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  4. the problem with herding or farming is the learning curve and disasters that will befall you - if you have used up your stockpile waiting for the die-of to finish, you will find yourself joining the second stage die-off.
    So you want enough of a stock pile to survive the die-off, And then enough of a stock pile to carry you through the subsequent learning curves and disasters you are sure to have-
    of course if you have gone through the learning curve PRE- die off, you can store a little less (aka have the farm).

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    Replies
    1. Course, for the really poor, extra stockpiling is much cheaper than a farm- overpopulation in rainfall areas being what it is.

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    2. Yeah, but its not that expensive to throw some seeds in the ground and see if you can get them to grow, nothing huge, just a few things that should be able to tolerate the climate one is in. Or a single 'pet' chicken or goat.
      That little bit of experience can make a huge difference and give one a real sense of the scale of efforts it would take to survive of just those sort of sources (and probably bump up ones stockpiling from that!).

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    3. oKAY, GOOD POINT. dOESN'T HAVE TO BE ALL OR NOTHING ( excuse cap lock )

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