Tuesday, February 18, 2014

SBJABOBno14

SBJABOBno14

Another Bug Out Book

Travel Gear

(note: this one should have been posted prior to the Junk Land chapter. In the final book it will appear that way )

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Fleeing naked into the wilderness, even on a bright sunny day in semi-tropical areas, is almost a sure way to get yourself killed. Besides which for most of us it can embarrassing if anyone sees us ( genetically modified corn syrup based diets can result in some bizarre and unnatural body shapes- the least offensive but only relatively speaking being the Muffin Top ). And fleeing into the same area with every piece of equipment known to man will so over encumber you that you will easily die. A Roman Legionnaire in full armor and weapons kit easily lugged sixty extra pounds, as does his modern equivalent. In their element they did superbly and the weight helped rather than hindered. Yet like all greenhouse award winning flowers that are perfection incarnate under ideal conditions, introduce any interference and the casualty rate grows exponentially. Survivalists fleeing suburbia are NOT members of a military unit and they are wise to avoid trying to play one on TV. Most military units ( at least in today’s imperial forces ) are highly mechanized or highly trained infantrymen. You are not ( and even if you are experienced, generally you don’t have the equivalent infrastructure ). Packing too much crap, as evident in almost any discussion on bugging out, is far more dangerous than beneficial.

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At a bare minimum, you need shelter and fuel. You can add to that, and most do. They add so much because they believe it to be life saving, luxurious or essential. I’ve never actually seen a bug out discussion suggest that one bring the kitchen sink, but I have seen nearly everything else added to a list that easily adds half your body weight to a backpack. Granted, we are talking here of bicycle cargo, but you still have to expend energy moving that weight. So you pack food to pack more stuff, and that adds to the weight. It is a vicious cycle. The less gear you carry, the less weight and the less weight the less food you need and the overall lightness of your being allows you to be highly mobile and extremely fast. That is your advantage, compared to most other refugees and most government personnel.

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Either a light weight sleeping bag or a combo wool blanket and space blanket ( the blanket is heavy and the space blanket fragile and noisy, so this is only better than nothing if you can’t afford a bag ) will keep you alive overnight ( obviously, this varies by climate. You might need an artic bag ). Have a waterproof tarp to keep the rain off. Have a straw filter for water purification and a canteen ( one advantage of a bike over a walker is you can carry more water. But have a canteen on you in case you lose the bike ). Obviously, you should never go anywhere without a knife. Socks are essential for keeping your feet dry. Have a small LED flashlight and a few Bic lighters placed throughout your belongings ( the cheaper brands often don’t work right out of the pack ). I’d bring some TP myself. I wouldn’t want to be grabbing some poison oak by mistake after dark. And as long as you have food that doesn’t need to be cooked, and a few tools and spare parts for the bike, that should be about all you need for a modest length bug out ( if you are bugging out across country, you are dead meat. I hope whatever you were doing prior to escaping was worth it ).

END

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23 comments:

  1. "Either a light weight sleeping bag or a combo wool blanket and space blanket ( the blanket is heavy and the space blanket fragile and noisy, so this is only better than nothing if you can’t afford a bag ) will keep you alive overnight ( obviously, this varies by climate. You might need an artic bag ). Have a waterproof tarp to keep the rain off. Have a straw filter for water purification and a canteen ( one advantage of a bike over a walker is you can carry more water. But have a canteen on you in case you lose the bike )."

    Good article James.

    I would add that if the weather is reasonably warm, that you can kill two birds with one stone, and get a GI Poncho with the liner for added warmth.

    I would get the canteen that has the metal cup that slips onto the bottom, to use for water purification, and as a simple pot.

    Also, if you're in an arid, or semi-arid region, it wouldn't hurt to add some plastic sheeting to your gear, so as to make a solar still for water procurement. Plastic garbage bags are lightweight, and also useful for water procurement from vegetation (Make sure that you know that it is non-poisonous), as well as emergency raingear/shelter.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Of course, that REALLY slows you down and you need far more than one to give you much water at all. I'd stick to surface water sources on my bug-out.

      Delete
  2. Oh Great Bubble Head of the Gonorrhea Basin

    it's the end of the world and you want to ride a bike? Dumbtastic Dakin!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dammit Jim, don't teach Brenda how to spell. It will never shut up.

      Delete
    2. The average Roman soldier was about 5' 3" and weighed in at about 135 pounds. His total kit weight was about 80 pounds, this included the two presharpened pales he had to carry for bivouacs. The Roman soldier carried this because Roman military justice leaned toward the death penalty for even the most minor infraction. Hoorah indeed.

      Now back to the present: All gear must be based on the physical (you) and the terrain/environment (remember Florida?).
      Break it down into kits:
      #1 Shelter/Protection - The US poncho + liner with a sewing kit, 4 bungee cords and a couple of Lord Bison approved wool socks. Roll it up and cinch, its still less in weight and size than many commercial sleep bags I've found. Note: add a wool blanket and Mylar for times when the temp gets below 30F. Death is always possible.
      #2 Water - a couple of 2 quart US canteens, filter straw and some purification tablets. A 1 quart canteen with a stainless steel cup is a good idea.
      #3 Fire - cigarette lighters, some waterproof matches (do not depend on this shit), and a magnesium/ferro fire kit Add various bits of tinder in protected containers.
      # 4 Food - Simple foods that can be eaten cold. Candy. MREs suck. Small fishing kit + small amount of flexible wire for snares. In the real world food doesn't jump on your plate.
      #5 Support - An often overlooked part; carry a small gear repair kit (depends on your gear), some duct tape, paracord and etc. This is in addition to the sewing kit mentioned in #1.
      #6 Defense - Depends on you and the situation. Pick your favorite boomstick and blade and argue yourself to death. I've got mine(*wink*).

      Once you've mastered the #1 roll the rest of this can be stuffed into a pillow case and a trash bag cover and strapped to the cargo rack of a Huffy Cruiser using bungee cords. It can also be unsnapped and carried in various ways on foot.
      Is this perfect? Hell No! Depends on whether you are in freezing Elkass or sweltering Possumlick.
      Add, subtract - but please don't multiply!

      Delete
    3. Even if your lighter doesn't have fuel, don't you still get some spark? Carry several lighters and I don't see the need for a magnesium stick. If you are really cutting down on the weight, every ounce counts.

      Delete
    4. Have you actually tried to get a spark from a dead lighter?

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    5. It's the magnesium shavings you need, not just a spark. You can spark those bics all you want. Do an experiment, pick your tinder and then spark start a fire with a bic. Then use your magnesium starter to start a fire. Which way was faster?

      Delete
    6. OK, so how about, say, a vasaline soaked cotton ball? I'm asking, not telling. Would the Bic start that?

      Delete
    7. "OK, so how about, say, a Vaseline soaked cotton ball? I'm asking, not telling. Would the Bic start that?"

      I'd still recommend that you carry a Ferrorod James. They're light enough, and can easily be carried around your neck. I've had Bics screw up on me, and the wheel jammed up solid. If they get wet, they're useless until you manage to dry them out. Not true with a Ferrorod though. The spark from a Bic would probably light a cotton ball? Don't know, never tried it? But one blast from a Ferrorod will instantly burst a cotton ball to flames. I don't know that you want to impregnate the entire cotton ball in Vaseline though? I've never tried it that way, but it might be harder to ignite if it were completely smeared with Vaseline?

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    8. Ok, fair enough advice. I was trying to save too much weight, plus being here in the desert does insulate you from most normal water issues. Thanks.

      Delete
  3. King Bison:

    How much is your blog worth?

    One, two, millions or the five plus millions that it is posted.

    With all that money, why you are still greedy?

    Achieve financial wealth by living like a commie. Is that your motto?

    Yours truly

    F. U. King.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is worth five, and all this minial writing is by a starving crack smoking ghoast writer.

      Delete
  4. Excuse me Sir.

    How many bubbles you let go while riding that bike on temperatures below 35 degrees?

    I'm a student of biology and I'm surveying anyone that does stupid things
    .
    I'm seeking my doctorate in theoretical feces and trying to become like my hero Dr. Shitfinger.


    Thank you very much for your cooperation.

    Wish you luck and have a wonderful and venting ride on top of that bike.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Mr. Dakin:

    I just submitted an application to the Special Olympic Committee for a brand new bicycle race for five mile stretch in both events. One with a butt plug and the other one without. With your experience there is the likelihood of winning both events. And of course, YOU CAN BE INMORTALIZED as our Elko, Nev. champion and recognized for your tenacity.(which I admire very muchO).
    Please, don't let your minions down. I often ask how your body has deformed or adjust to the seat of that bike, after sooo many years on top of that seat.

    Please be our champ.

    I'll donate $$$ to that event, plus a big donation to the champ.

    ReplyDelete
  6. @ Ardmore.
    Hey old fart. It was not me.
    You are becoming senile in your old age.

    hahaha. blaming other people. that sounds stupid isn't it


    brenda

    ReplyDelete
  7. I like your kit idea - weight and bulk will be a killer so only the essentials. The list of needed items and their purpose will vary according to our respective locations. A poncho in the Northwest for shelter from rain would be needed for water collection in the desert, for example. Wayne - I've tried that solar distallation from a hole in the ground - it sucks. Transpiration bags (clear) are easier and when several are used, produce more water. Of course - you need trees with full sunlight to get maximum production.

    I still think the person will have to pick a well hidden site and choose to shelter in place though eventually, living out of a backpack self supported for even a month constantly on foot will be beyond most of us, especially during the winter. Right now would be a good time to find and build that site for maximum comfort. Way off the beaten path - internet maps are your friend right now, use them while you have them.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. "just the essentials" seems a foreign concept for bugging out

      Delete
    2. "Transpiration bags (clear) are easier and when several are used, produce more water. Of course - you need trees with full sunlight to get maximum production."

      @ 3:58, Yes, that was what I was referring to with the garbage bags in case I wasn't clear?

      Delete
    3. Anon 3:58 here - sorry, did not want to seem contentious. I was pointing out that some (myself included way back) think that ANY garbage / lawn bag will work - black, white, whatever. Sunlight needs to get through to leaves to work, hence the clear material reference above.

      Again - my apologies.

      Delete
    4. No worries; no offense taken. I even learned something new, as I did not know that the bag should be clear?

      The solar still can have potential as well, with a little modification. Urinate in the hole (It will be distilled, so no worries). Add vegetation, unclean or salty water, etc.

      Cheers,

      Wayne

      Delete