Thursday, February 27, 2014

guest article- article 2 of 2 today

GUEST ARTICLE
Handgun Choices for Today

At some time, in the future that we envision, a handgun is a "must have".

What would be a good but affordable choice today?

Gone are the days when you could get a surplus CZ, Makarov, or a police trade in Smith and Wesson 38 in good condition for $200.

Tokarovs are still available for $200 but there is zero 7.62x25 ammo available.

Something decent, yet affordable, today is going to cost you $300- $400.

Ruger, Smith and Wessons and used Glocks are currently the three main decent choices.

I think the choices should be limited to the calibers of 38special, 40SandW, and 9mm. I'd pick the 40 myself, but everyone's got to make their own choice. These three, because of their general overall availability. Stay away from all calibers that, during panic ammo buying, have gotten a reputation for sky high prices and unavailability. Some examples are 9x18, 32acp, 7.62x25 and the 380.

Rugers at JandG sales starting at: $320 for a 9mm.

Used Glocks at JandG sales are: model 22 starting at $379.00 (40 cal.)

Smith and Wesson 9mm semi for $340.

You'll need ammo for whatever you buy. Ideally you should practice on a regular basis. Prices and availability prohibit many from doing as much as they should. Dry firing does help improve you ability. Here, Amazon has a large selection of reasonably priced snap caps.

The ammo situation is better than it was a year or six months ago. Always check out the Wal-Mart shelves, sometimes they have a few boxes when all the guys online are sold out. Hopefully prices continue downward and availability continues to increase.

If there is a pawn shop in your area, make sure you check it out. Also keep an eye out for private individuals in your area that are selling a handgun.

Don't forget to get a holster, so that you are actually carrying your handgun, at that future time of need. When ever you buy a firearm, at that time, try to buy all the things that you will need. Extra mags are one example.

28 comments:

  1. I would be cautious with S&W. Their repair and replacement times for broken firearms are long. In some cases 9 months or more. That doesn't really matter in the scenario we are discussing, but it might be important until then. Glock and Ruger seem to have an excellent reputation for quick repair and return if something needs service.

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    1. Wasn't Rugar taking it up the pooper with the politicians, currying favor behind the scenes?

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    2. "I'd pick the 40 myself, but everyone's got to make their own choice. "

      The only problem that I see with the .40 is the cost and availability, since it is a relatively new calibre. Personally, I think that the .45 ACP is a better choice, but you must have your reasons for picking the .40.

      "Wasn't Rugar taking it up the pooper with the politicians, currying favor behind the scenes?"

      I can't recall the exact situation James? But yes, Bill Ruger was cooperative with the PTB.

      I'd like to offer an alternative? Obviously this is not an alternative for someone that seeks a greater rate of firepower, but a Cap and Ball Revolver, with an add on cartridge coversion cylinder. I have one for my Ruger Old Army, that converts it to .45 Long Colt. I have to take the cylinder (R&D) out to load/unload it. But on the Kirst, there is a rear loading gate. I can get one for my Colt 1860 Army, and with some modification on the rear loading gate section, load/unload the gun without taking the cylinder out. There's also an add on ejector available. The Remington model 1858 also has a quck removal cylinder, and has an available cartridge conversion cylinder as well. Be sure that what ever gun that you decide to purchase has a cartridge conversion cylinder available if you wish to go this route? You cannot use them on brass framed guns.

      An alternative to the cartridge conversion cylinder, is to buy a bunch of Cap and Ball cylinders (Which you can afford to do with the money that you save by not getting the expensive cartridge coversion cylinder} and pre-load them. Get a model like the 1858 that is designed to remove the cylinders quickly.

      I mention these guns because they are still affordable, as well as durable, and to be had without the all intimidating paper trail that accompanies firearms today.

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    3. "I'd pick the 40 myself, but everyone's got to make their own choice. "

      The only problem that I see with the .40 is the cost and availability, since it is a relatively new (At least compared to the .45 ACP) calibre. Personally, I think that the .45 ACP is a better choice, but you must have your reasons for picking the .40.

      "Wasn't Rugar taking it up the pooper with the politicians, currying favor behind the scenes?"

      I can't recall the exact situation James? But yes, Bill Ruger was cooperative with the PTB.

      I'd like to offer an alternative? Obviously this is not an alternative for someone that seeks a greater rate of firepower, but a Cap and Ball Revolver, with an add on cartridge conversion cylinder. I have one for my Ruger Old Army, that converts it to .45 Long Colt. I have to take the cylinder (R&D) out to load/unload it. But on the Kirst, there is a rear loading gate. I can get one for my Colt 1860 Army, and with some modification on the rear loading gate section, load/unload the gun without taking the cylinder out. There's also an add on ejector available. The Remington model 1858 also has a quick removal cylinder, and has an available cartridge conversion cylinder as well. Be sure that what ever gun that you decide to purchase has a cartridge conversion cylinder available if you wish to go this route? You cannot use them on brass framed guns.

      An alternative to the cartridge conversion cylinder, is to buy a bunch of Cap and Ball cylinders (Which you can afford to do with the money that you save by not getting the expensive cartridge conversion cylinder} and pre-load them. Get a model like the 1858 that is designed to remove the cylinders quickly.

      I mention these guns because they are still affordable, as well as durable, and to be had without the all intimidating paper trail that accompanies firearms today.

      Delete
    4. I see the advantage- you only worry about the primers, and can mostly ignore the brass and the powder.

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    5. You can also Pre-roll Nitrate treated paper cartridges. Actually, the Nitrate might even be optional?

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    6. You can also pre-roll Nitrate treated paper cartridges. Actually, the Nitrate might even be optional?

      Delete
  2. Could go with a "brick with a grip" for $200

    http://www.hi-pointfirearms.com/handguns/handguns_9mm.html

    Dennis

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    1. I bought one in 45acp and I like it more than most 1911's . It eats all my reloads that I put in it even rolled down brass from under sizing before bullet seating. Lifetime of the gun warranty and made in USA. I don't work for them but the guns work for me. Plus they make a 45acp carbine same mags as pistols. Working on a fast, flat, 185gr carbine load at present. Check out youtube Iraqvet post 300yrd shots. If I didn't already have 45 I might of went 40 cheaper brass once fired. Lake Erie Pirate

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  3. I bought several long guns and handguns about the time in 2008 when the prices went "way up". Was told that I should wait. Now, those same items cost at least as much and mostly more than when they were supposedly "overpriced". Best advice: Buy what you can afford now. In 3-4 years, the item will just cost even more.

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  4. The single best thing that ever happened to Ruger was Bill Ruger dying. They are now free to (and have extensively) come out with new stuff that the public actually wants. Bill Ruger was an ass kisser extrodinaire and was one of the first to adopt the ten round pistol magazine - before it was required. Rest in Hell, Bill.

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    1. And don't worry-won't be too long Reno and Hilary will join you for a three-some.

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  5. Guys:

    I have no guns....But if I did I would not be so stupid to mention it in the internet. Specially putting my IPO I jeopardy. Presently I'm using somebody else's location to mention or visit sites similar to this one. Rarely use my own lap top.

    But, go ahead. Keep mentioning what you have. The task will be easier comes the day.

    signed.

    Stu Piddas.
    Israel.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The goobernment tracks ownership through the purchase permission/fee. They don't wait for you to admit it.

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    2. Them coming to me for my stuff will save me money on gas when the gloves come off.

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  6. Try gunbot-dot-net for your ammo buying needs. Shows many retailers with an "in stock" and "price per round" function. Hi-points are reliable, if sort of brick-like. I wouldn't touch the S&W 9VE or 40VE. I went with the Taurus PT-99 and 92. With a little dremeling on the mag catch I can use the plentiful USGI M9 mags for $10each. On Armslist-dot-com you can do local P2P transactions...no papers.

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  7. My thoughts and reasons are similar to folks here. As far as caliber, for a revolver, 357 is ideal because it has a lot of power and you can load it with 38 for practice and folks that want less recoil. Not knocking 44 or 22 as they both have a purpose. If I was in bear country a 44 would be my go to in a revolver. I have 2 357s. I have 22s. Love them but I consider a handgun primarily for self defense and not my first choice.

    In the auto class. Don't put your life in the hands of a hi-point. I could never get the hang of holding it sideways while i shot it anyway. If its all you have than maintain it, have a smith polish all the edges and hope for the best. I don't hate on folks for what they can afford but have my opinions.

    Caliber for autos? I swear by the 40. You can usually find it and 45 at walmart. (the walmart ammo test) Why 40 over 45? I like the 45 and love 1911 style pistols but a typical 45 is a single stack with maybe 7 or 8 round capacity. I am not comfortable shooting a double stack 45 as the grips are just short of 2x4 size. My Glock 23s and a 22 carry 13 and 15 rounds respectively. Twice the rounds...

    If you look at a ballistic table, the 45 travels maybe 960fps and up muzzle velocity. The 40 starts at around 1300fps and up. The energy is comparable between the two. And I like the idea of twice the shots.

    9mm is a good round in a compact pistol but when you have to run expensive hot loads to be effective than its not for me. Besides, I haven't seen nearly the availability. If you are invested already in 9mm, so be it. Stick to it. It is just on the minimum end of the scale to me.

    Any hand gun is better than none within reason. My now ex-wife carries a 380 Bersa thunder. At 21 feet she can keep the rounds in the space of a verticle dollar bill at rapid fire. It is a decent pocket gun. I tried to find a compact 9mm but she had trouble cycling the shorter compact action. As a retired cop I train folks to do all the clearing drills ect. We settled on the Bersa cause she could work it. Compromise.

    Good handguns are not cheap. Any name brand is going to hit you for $400 on up. Folks are not giving anything away used either. If you consider the need of a ccw for the future though, it is a worthwhile investment.

    The opinions expressed here are of the commenter and do not reflect the opinions of Lord Bison or his affiliates LOL

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    1. Did you really shoot a Hi-point? Honestly now? I got rid of two Walther ppk-s because I couldn't get them to cycle reliably. Hi-point is cheap, ugly, heavy, black plastic covered. Affordable, reliable and guaranteed. It ate all my poorly made reloads with out a problem. I got better at reloading since. Lake Erie Pirate

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    2. Lake Erie Pirate, I have handled them but never pulled the trigger. Heavy and I didnt like how it felt ergonomically. I converted to Glocks about 7 years ago when I was issued one and never looked back. Other good guns out there but I like the weatherproof finish on the Glocks.

      Whereabouts you from? Not an NSA spy here, just from a small town south of Erie.

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    3. Michigan Erie by chance? I am just out of range from there with a 7.62 NATO LEP

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  8. Good post Dakin. Are you seeing a new therapist?

    tiffany

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    1. You know this is a guest article, right?

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    2. OW!

      Looks Like I have some competition.

      You Know Who
      MM

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    3. "Tokarovs are still available for $200 but there is zero 7.62x25 ammo available."
      As of today (2/27) six sites that have Tokarev ammo in stock are listed here: http://www.gunbot.net/ammo/pistol/762x25/

      BTW, this is a good site for checking stock on other ammo and reloading components.

      Delete
  9. Ammunition drought is taking a real toll on shooting sports. The ones who don't have it can't get anything, and the one's who socked some way don't want to shoot it because it may be a real long time before it comes back. One of the parents of my son's bowling tournament mentioned he had a real need for .22 rimfire CB type ammunition for backyard vermin eradication - couldn't find a box to save his life. I brought him a 100 round box of CCI Quiet - and have a friend for life, he was really grateful for it.

    Speaking of which - vermin eradication in SHTF will be needed. Traps work, but when you need that varmint gone NOW, a pellet pistol (pump or springer) is a very handy item to keep handy. Also a very good way to keep your shooting practice inexpensive and quiet - well worth the cost. A lot of my shooting friends have added a pellet rifle and / or pistol for this reason. Shooting accurately requires practice and when you slack off, so do your results.

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    1. Even a $30 Crossman pump and a big bag of BB's is cheap enough insurance ( yes, I know there are much better available ).

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  10. Get a .45. It is one of the most common calibers and is easy to reload compared to 9mm or 40. I'm talking using lead after the supply of hi tech hollow points dries up and we are reduced to melting down battery lead and scavenging wheel weights to make bullets. I would rather have a 45 blob to shoot than a 9mm blob.

    Also buy a simple handloading kit, the kind that uses a hammer and hand operated press. Can be carried with you and used anywhere. Switch dies and reload rifle and handgun. When all the factory ammo is gone reloading might save your butt.

    My fav handgun is a S & W 625, shoots 45 ACP. Even shoots crappy reloads that will jam up an auto. Bulletproof gun.

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    1. Myself, I rethought post-apoc 45's after I shot a few boxes of reloads. Revolvers are the way to go.

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