Wednesday, December 4, 2013

shelter


SHELTER

We had a minion comment on a house being the only available option financially that made good sense in their area, in response to yesterday’s article.  And I know a lot of folks are in the same boat.  I’ve lived in many different states, and in many different areas in the same state, back in the days when I was a nomad, and I know exactly what is being discussed.  Many places won’t allow cheap alternatives to shelter.  Today is a lot different than forty years ago- as the economic pie has shrunk along with our energy supply and our military, the moneyed interests have tightened their grasp and squeezed through decree and rule and deceit.  You really must move from a location that prohibits any action other than handing over your entire paycheck to others.  Especially now that you are about to pay a huge increase in the medical insurance industry shake down tax.  And don’t think it is going to end there.  There will be more laws like Obamacare.  Compulsory purchases of crap you can’t afford.  But, please, I’m begging you, don’t buy a house you can’t walk away from as it will tie you to local predators.  If your state has laws forcing you to pay the bankers, regardless of ability ( say, after the locals double your property taxes and your job cut your pay ), for an inflated house price, don’t buy a house in that state ( not that the feds couldn’t change the law at any time ). 

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An apartment might be more expensive, but you have the ability to move.  If you must, take on a roommate.  They are usually intolerable asswhores, but their money spends ( I like weekly rentals so you can kick them out quickly if they annoy you ).  Sometimes, a used travel trailer payment plus lot rent is no more than an apartment, and you can move your dwelling with you.  You don’t want to be stuck in a location that puts too high a bondage fee on you.  And a house can trap you.  Look at New Jersey.  The average property tax is $12k a year.  A couple that bought a house there in 1950 after the war is now paying more in taxes every year than what they bought the house for, at a time when their age means they need that money for medical bills.  You want to live in a state like that?  If you have family to look after, give them an ultimatum of moving with you or being left behind.  At this moment, a house is cheap monthly in a lot of areas compared to renting.  Yet renting is throwing away money.  But a house is just renting from first the bankers and then the county.  In the long run, the rest of your life, buying junk land, living in a temporary shelter and building your own small house will save you hundreds of thousands of dollars.  And give you actual security you can’t get as a renter.

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31 comments:

  1. I think that you're in a good state James (Texas being the other) as far as a long term collapse goes. Both Nevada and Texas allow for an allodial title, that allows the property taxes on a property to be paid for life in one lump sum (Based on the youngest living person in the household). On an inexpensive piece of junk land, this should be next to nothing.

    As you've mentioned though, the laws can be changed to suit the PTB at any time. Though it would seem less likely that a piece of worthless desert land would ever sell at a tax default auction (To be clear though, this is exactly how Phil Garlington acquired his worthless patch of desert in Southern CA).

    Still, I think that this option provides the best choice, as far as a stable, long term, legal squat is concerned.

    "An apartment might be more expensive, but you have the ability to move."

    I had the same thoughts Jim. Never buy, but rent an apartment, and have a well stocked piece of junk land. If you ever find yourself unemployed, and unable procure other employment, you at least have a well stocked legal squat to fall back on, and will avoid the homelessness that many experienced for the first time a few years back.

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    1. One of the best economic places. Long term survival, the 1000 year drought is going to cripple this place.

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  2. SUCKERS, keep paying property taxes. hahaha. homeownership is stupid. I been free loading from my employers by taking showers at the co's, taking extra coffee and donuts from the office lounge. I park my camper next to the electrical outlet on the side of the building. (the one I installed)...I'm rent free, others pay at least $ 1000.00 monthly rent. I watch free t.v., use the co's computer, wash my truck for free, even replace my battery free. It's great to be a maintanence mechanic. When there is a breakdown I'm the first one they get and pay is great.
    I don't miss the bitch that left me for a younger guy. They just lost the 2nd house and right now , both are unemployed. Life payback it's a bitch. Fellow worker been losing their homes (sorry to see that). They traded their paid homes for the new homes in a homeowners association nieghbourhood (that's was totally stupid). Now days I'm financially in great standing. I can buy a house but I wont pay their prices. Just waiting 6 more months to get the place that I eyed. Is about to go in the market and I will get it for 25% of their original price. When I get it, Its gonna be mine, no wives to claim part of it. If I ever need female companionship, I will rent it, not be legally bound to pay alimony for every 1/2 a minute they spend with me.
    After retirement I'll go abroad and get younger pieces of "you know what". Every week . not the same OLD thing used and abused by all the ex's they been with.

    THEY ARE NOT GOING TO FIND A SUCKER ON ME.

    You full me once, shame on you. You full me twice (it wont happen) , shame on me.

    Rambo.

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    1. I think it was "lighten up Francis" Jim? Stripes right?

      In either event, Rambo's on the right path.

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    2. That would be .....Francis, the talking Jack Ass?

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  3. Good advice Lord Bison. With inflation crushing us blue-collar-poor-white-trash types, I'm seeing many, many people unable to keep up maintainance on the houses they bought. Peeling paint, blistered roofing shingles, sagging porches, etc. is the norm in many areas. No money to fix anything. Think Detroit. That's the future for us peons.

    If we must live like peasants then I say it is best to do it out in a rural area. At least you can be poor in private that way. Freedom and privacy is what gives poor rural folk dignity.

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    1. Being poor is nice in the country. In the city, you just invite criminals

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  4. A few years ago i read a storie on 2 newjersey couples like what you descibed.The man and wife was almost retirment age and ran the numbers taxes on the house was going to be 70% of their income.They sold their home of 35 years bought an airstream set up a pad in there sons yard next door to park it.County came along said it was a violation to live in it.Their solution was to rent a lot in florida establish a residecy.They spent 6 months in florida the rest back at their sons with weekend trips to other relitives just to deny New jersey income and property taxes.The travel and lot rent was less than a 1/3 of the savings.And Christie wants to be our president.SCARY

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    1. Ya play by their rules, they change the rules and screw you over. Bastards

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  5. True that, but the bad thing about renting is the owner has the option of yanking it right beneath your feet, FORCING you to move out very quickly. I think owning the junk land option is better.

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    1. Granted. I was thinking more along the lines of just renting as you researched where to buy junk land

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  6. Thanks Lord Bison

    The conclusion I reach is that I should buy a throw away house in full to side step the banker scum. I could just walk away from or sell for pennies on the dollar if I need to get out of dodge.

    I'd just have to deal with the local authorities and the property tax they'll charge me which will run about 2,000 a year in these parts.

    It will cost about 100K to buy such a dump, after the initial outlay the upkeep and tribute should be manageable.

    RV camp spots are very limited around here, expensive, and need reservations ahead of time. A lot of monied blue blood like to do the motor home thing in these parts, I'm in New England. Apartments are a no go, too afraid to store my preps anywhere around apartments for fear of theft and the law.

    I've got about 130K obammy bucks sitting around, maybe I should spend these notes before they go bad and expire. Took 10 years of penny pinching and hump busting to earn that. If you do the math on a 30 year home loan by the time you're done you've paid for the house almost twice over so it makes sense to me to save up and pay in full even though everyone tells me it's crazy to do that.

    That's the problem with finding ways around the bullshit everyone does, the herd will really try to push you back into being normal right down to family interventions to save you from yourself. They want you to buy a big shiny McMansion money hole like everyone else has, just think of the resale value they say.

    A problem I see with the cheap shacks around here is that they have little land, 1/8 to 1/4 acre half of which the house sits on. Providing your own food from the land is out other than some supplemental fixings. Guess that's what stock piled wheat and albino mouse turds are for, right? Survive longer than the neighbors then take over their lots? Haha.

    My fear of making a big mistake which leaves me doing nothing. I've kept waiting for doom for so long but doom is almost too good to be true in a way. I'm thinking it's going to be a long slow grind down with doom visiting each of us individually.

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    1. Just talked to a guy here in Elko. His Florida house sold for $75k, he put that down on a $200k FIXER-UPPER?!?! If there are jobs available, the houses go for insane amounts.

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    2. I've had similar issues with too much cash sitting around ( relitive to my income of course ). I usualy misinvest it trying to get rid of it.

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    3. An abandonned farmstead out in the midwest or anywhere will start at 40k....a couple bought an old farmhouse with a couple barns for 75k with 4 acres. They added siding and a cheap garage, and now they are flipping it for $110k, and haven't had a buyer. and the original had been on the market for months. There are lots of opportunities to spend less than 100k including money to fix the place up to livable, and have a lot left over.

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    4. Just want to point out that FL knucklehead in Elko isn't this FL knucklehead, who's still here.

      Yeah, having money lying around is a distraction. You eventually wind up wasting it. Sorta like life.

      Wife talked me into staying here till 2014. Be damn near 50 then.

      Gil

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  7. So, throughout the midwest there are hundreds or thousands of abandonned farmesteads (i.e., a few acres and a 100 year old house) that is completely useless to the corporate farmer that bought the 160 acres attached to it to plant their GMO corn. Livable houses starting at 40k up to 120k depending upon how much land. Make an offer, and most of the owners I know won't care what you do on that 3 acres, nor will really care if you make any improvements or just move a trailer onto the property (will full use of the barns, grain bins, etc. for storage to build a comfortable living room, etc.). Myself, a 3 bedroom, 20 acre plot with a half-a-dozen outbuildings and someone renting 15 acres from me from the day I signed the paperwork. Over 75% of all farmers are over the age of 65, and the number above 75 equals the number below 25 ...Many are retiring everyday and there are houses galore! 3 abandonned homesteads and 3 houses for sale along my stretch of road. Plenty of opportunities to rent a house or just get a space for a trailer.

    Lord Bison, as I drive to my place, I have seen of your minions ....at two travel trailers have been installed on scrap pieces of land that obviously are of no use to their previous owners. Both were installed ongrid, and the owners of the trailers are trying to build up their gardens/orchards as quickly as they can. Ironically, one trailer is right next to a You-Store-It, and as one drives by, one can tell that they a couple of the storage units filled themselves.

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  8. I'm getting too old to live in a hut. We bought the smallest house on the biggest lot we could find. Low property tax and cheap utility's in a county that will let small tax arrears go forever( that could change). We have a well with a high water table and a hand pump. I have thrown away 2 fortunes on ex wives, this one is almost keeping me up....

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  9. How important is distance to work? I've been trying to find something within 3 miles so that I can walk if needed but 3 mile radius is very limiting. If I search neighboring towns I can a lot more properties for cheap, about 10 to 15 miles away but then I'll be dependent on a car. Drive a cheap beater now, I estimate it costs about 3,000 a year to keep the car fueled and driving around legally. Would like the option of trading that for a huffy when times get tougher.

    Is it's not worth the concern and that when the fuel stops flowing from the gas pumps the gigs up anyhow or does it make sense to be able to dump the car when needed and walk to work?

    Peak oil is a concern of mine but I suppose if you can't get gas at the pump the factory I work at will be closed too, they truck in and out all their stuff plus all their products are oil based.

    Wonder how that will go down when there start to be fuel shortages, if priority will be given to farmers, then government/law/fire/ambulance then commercial trucking, and finally everyone else on a limited basis? For now the market will ration fuel by pricing out wasteful activities but eventually there might be some sort of control.

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    1. 10 miles is bike-able at neccessity or with enough practice, less than an hours ride infact. Get an electric scooter, or even a gas one, and suddenly you have a back up daily communter costing you comparitive pennies. Still steeper than a bike but easier to do. Keep the car/truck in shape and drive occassionally when weather is bad enough (I have a 1/2 mile commute that I COULD walk / bike, but with it being -15F before wind chill I sort of decline that option, for a few weeks. Once it is warm, enough back to shoe leather and two wheel transport for me except for hauling and similar errands.)

      Get the parts & instructions for converting your transport to alcohol or veggy oil fuels - or stick with electric that you can charge between the rolling blackouts to come. This will allow you to maintain a ride until the last possible moment.

      You can even walk 10 miles when in truely poor shape if you take long enough (I've done it- hauling a pack and a kid - gotten in slightly better shape since). Not the sort of thing for the average cubical drone to do daily but a possible emergency one time measure.

      Those who plan on walking more than @15 miles during an emergency in less than a day who arent in GREAT shape, (i.e.: national+ EMP strike) are fooling themselves though.

      I predict that the predicted 'golden hordes' wont happenexcept like mollases if motorized transport isnt available in a large scale emergency.
      Heck look at Katrina - a single city ended up with most the people being locked in a sporting arena or leaving in their cars (or euthanized if they were to ill to leave). Anyone COULD have walked out, or made an improvised raft and rowed. Vanishingly few DID.

      So you need to have alternatives because Peak Oil might not be an overnight thing (probably wont in fact) Moto-bike/ scooter at first and then regular bike as your condition and practice improve. You will need employment of some sort until the day you die, but you could become a small scale farmer using a big garden cart made from your bike parts to haul in veggies to sell once a month or so during the season.

      So keep the distance in mind but dont get hung up about a few miles only more than a dozen is a real problem.

      -Grey


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    2. Wouldn't tatters be a better bet to haul in to sell? Calories before vitamins in a hunger situation ( yes, I know a potato is a veggie. When you say "veggies" most think salad ingrediants- not trying to nitpick )

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    3. Tatters are the best, I grow a garden and until I started planting tatters I got very few calories from it, just lots of greens and a salad stuff. Also highly recommend rutabagas, easy and fast growing filling and animals don't bother then. Similar to turnips but better tasting, don't get too spicy when they get big like the turnips do.

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    4. But don't turnips work good for livestock fodder?

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  10. HEMP???

    http://www.wikihow.com/Make-a-Bong

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cThzMyWgxso

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tdwZ3mrRW1w

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  11. You are right. My in-laws sold their New York State property and moved to rural Texas. In fact, they saved so much money they built a nice cottage in MO too.

    Property can work for you, but it has to WORK for you. I've got a well, septic, solar power, fish, game and gardens. There's also enough sustainably harvestable firewood in walking distance to keep the place warm. It more than makes up for the taxes. Of course, my taxes aren't New Jersey crazy. Also got a heck of a deal on the property years ago.

    That being said, in a few years we want to sell the house to kids and move to a small piece of property across the street. We'll put a something like a 20 ft. yurt there and call it good. The rest of the time we'll live on a cheap sailboat.

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  12. Every once in a while I reread Jack Kerouac's Dharma Bums. Man, 1955 seems as distant in time as 1855( I wasn't born until 1959 -so yeah). A few years ago I read an interview with Gary Snyder (Japhy Ryder in the book) and he was talking about how, back then, you could get off the bus in San Francisco and rent a room ( about a dollar a week) and get a job and get on with your life in a single day. Like I said - ancient history. But anywho; renting and owning both has negatives: are you paying out 3/4 of your salary for a former walk in closet, do you own that house or does it (and the county) own you? I've had too much Red Bull again and lost my train of thought.

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  13. In June 1991 I paid $15k cash for this older woodframe on 0.44 acre. (If I had borrowed $15k I'd have had to repay about $40k total.)

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  14. Thanks everyone, but this is one of those times I don't have the time to respond to each comment. I try not to do that often. I have ten minutes to start on the clock. When it's single digit cold I take an extra 15 to get to work and an extra 10 to undress from all my layers. After the article is written, almost no extra Internet time is left. Cheers, and please don't stop commenting!

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  15. Your just saying that NJ is a terrible place to retire. Retire in a State that has low property taxes. The best option is an extraction State (Texas and Alaska come immediately to mind) that tax the businesses to lower taxes to individuals.

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    1. I think I'm saying NJ just sucks, period :)

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