Tuesday, November 19, 2013

SBJABOBno9


SBJABOBno9

Another Bug Out Book

Bike Cargo

 

[ I skipped over no 8.  I’ve made my previous article on “what kind of bike” into that chapter ]

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A bicycle can carry a lot of weight.  Which usually is comprised of the operator.  Your standard US adult bike is rated at 250 pounds.  If you are in shape, that means you and from thirty to fifty pounds of equipment.  If you are a Lard Lad, you’ll need a better bike costing a lot more money.  But let’s assume you are 200 pounds give or take a healthy bowel movement.  Fifty pounds is a lot of stuff that your bike will carry a lot easier than your back can.  I’ve carried more when I was in the military, and I don’t recommend it.  You are so encumbered by weight that not only can you not move very well, you can’t pay attention to your surroundings or threat levels.  Overloading a soldier is in essence putting a large sign around their neck-“I’m a stupid plodding mule, please shoot me at your leisure”.  You as a civilian should not strive to emulate the military practice of logistics.  Let the bike carry the weight, and don’t be stupid about how much you need or can haul.  Just like the military, I could easily envision hundreds of pounds of “essentials”.  But all you are doing is transporting yourself from A to B without getting killed.  You don’t need the kitchen sink with night vision capacity to do so.

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Fifty pounds is your limit, both for the bikes capacity and for your ease of use.  While a bike handles the weight well, it still makes for harder pedaling and more weight you must balance.  I’ve hauled full five gallon propane bottles and 12v batteries by bike and I’d advise a limit of thirty pounds maximum.  But go for fifty as the upper limit.  They sell cargo racks for bikes that hold fifty pounds.  Don’t buy a crappy Wal-Mart unit that attaches to your seat post.  Get the kind that rests near the back wheel axle and only uses the seat post as a stabilizer.  A bike shop will want up to $50 for one, so shop around.  Just beware that while recently Wal-Mart has been dropping the quality of all non-food items ( shoes that never break in, spray lubricant that lets all the air out while leaving the oil inside ) in a desperate attempt to stay in business, their bike parts has been much worse for far longer.  Almost all items there must be suspect.  I’ve put a milk crate on my cargo rack- my water hauling bottles fit nicely inside.  I also have a Pee-Wee Herman basket on my front handle bars.  Between the two, thirty to fifty pounds hauls well.  If you have a garage sale bike, the racks might cost more than the bike plus new parts.  But they are definitely worth it.  Even biking, a backpack with much more than ten-fifteen pounds in it is painful. Let the bike carry it.

END

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20 comments:

  1. I've seen a few people riding the adult versions of the tricycles around town. The ones that I have seen have a nice large rack on the back; sort of a "bike truck" if you will?

    Don't know what they cost? But they sure look like they would be useful for the purposes that you're discussing here.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Around the same as a quality American assembled bike shop two wheeler. $300-400. Great for extra load, you can jump off and flee/fight without dumping the thing. But extra wide so an issue in high vegitation area perhaps.

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  2. Speaking of lard lads and gals.

    www.vinny2007.tumblr.com.

    They been eating too much wheat.

    They even look wheatty.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Yeah!

    www.vinny2007.tumblr.com

    ReplyDelete
  4. Caution. Lard lass ass video. Why do I bother?

    ReplyDelete
  5. I changed the phrase "ON the rear axle" to "NEAR the rear axle". Sorry about that. A rack bolts on to most frames, it doesn't bolt to the wheel.

    ReplyDelete
  6. My Huffy Cruiser can handle me and my Shit 'N Git bag. Mainly because my SNG is not very capacious. I recommend that people look into the concept of modularization, AKA Leave Behind.
    Here is a kit bag that works great with bikes:
    http://www.amazon.com/Condor-Deployment-Bag-Black-5-5-Inch/dp/B003W96GG8/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1384902271&sr=8-1&keywords=condor+deployment+bag
    This bag can be worn with a shoulder strap(detachable), on the belt like butt bag, or on the inside of the handlebars(i.e. facing you). I have a basic survival kit and a road rash kit in this sucker. Note: depending on your handlebars, you might need some kind of extra stabilizer.
    Condor sells a bigger version, but I can't say anything about it - because I don't own it.
    Happy Trails.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Is "leave behind" the same as "bugging in"? Haven't heard the term.

      Delete
    2. Leave behind is a concept that came in with the USMC M1941 pack system. The M1941 used as a base the modular "take it or leave it". Basically: You establish a base camp and secure your necessaries, then you hunt/patrol with only the kit you need. You can google this but it breaks down into:

      Bedroll - long or short
      Haversack - combat survival
      Rucksack - Clothes, toiletries and such(AKA leave behind)

      I became a history nerd when I found out - The Bitch Keeps Doing The Same Thing Over And Over.

      Delete
    3. History never gets old ( I mean the study thereof ). OK, the army had something of a system such as that- I don't recall if it had a name. It could have been "instead ALL your impossible to carry crap, just take half for your ninja stealth patrol. We've use the noise of your death to zero in the artie"

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    4. The US Army adopted the M1941 in M1948, Big Green is slow. This is the kit, with variations, that ground pounders wore until the introduction of the ALICE crap in the early 70s. Hint: That's the real reason Rambo was so pissed off!
      As an aside. I read an essay by David Morrell, the creator of John Rambo, Davey pointed out that Rambo had become a word in the English language: I checked my Kindle ... son of a bitch - Rambo is a word!

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  7. Back in my prime when I had sixpack abs and no fat to speak of I weighed 255 lbs. then. Now I am old I have gained 20 lbs and weigh about 275. Sorry for all you scrawny people. I am a full sized adult. Guess I'll get a horse.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. More stewpot meat for folks to chase after. Run, rat, run!

      Delete
  8. Bike cargo trailer, maybe ... as low as $100 or so .... or build your own from scrap materials. Thanks to your discussions before, I 'invested' part of my inheritance into a Worksman front-loading industrial cargo hauler .... supports over 500 pounds with a nice convenient coaster break. Their industrial bikes start at about $400, but with heavy duty spokes, even the entry level bikes with no upgrades are rated at 400 pounds ...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I was going to go with the heavy duty industrial bike, but realized all parts would then need to be mail ordered. However, you are really buying a lifetime piece of equipment which is great. Any ideas on what business you'll be doing with it?

      Delete
    2. Worksman already has my money. One front-hauler bike cost $165 to ship. Adding a couple extra bikes for multiple family members to be productive (i.e. smaller cruiser, low-center-of-gravity pizza delivery bike) brought to the total shipping to just over $200. But very good quality bikes. We did buy all the bikes with similar tires, similar coaster hubs, so we'll have fewer individual spare parts and all of them are scavengeable to others. Just hope that they ship and arrive before New York collapses (the worst thing about Worksman is they are located and pay taxes in libtardopia).

      One funny story I ran across while researching them: A guy on a forum said, "My boss is having me replace our 65-year old Worksman industrial bikes we use in our warehouse. Anyone know a good manufacturer that makes industrial bikes or what I should buy to replace them?" The responses were worthy of his question ...

      Yeah, the wife was questioning the purchase amount for them, but then the logic of the quality purchase brought her around. We bought a couple of fluffy 21-speed ride around for fun bikes) to get into shape and and make it easier to transition. The entire inheritance went into preps (minus a couple creature comforts for my wife to docorate/support the household, keep the peace offerings). Additional Food, more solar panels, inverters, bikes, gardening hardware including fencing,tools including a walkbehind tractor with implements to accomplish everything that needs done on our 10 acre patch, wool blankets/socks, and a single nickel-iron battery (ouch, but relative to buying new batteries every 2-5 years, a lifetime good purchase. Still Ouch.)

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    3. I'm still wondering if a nickel-iron batt is home replicateable. I've seen plans for very small ones, almost powerless hobby types. How hard could it be to dupe if its 120 year old stuff? I don't think I could spend more on a battery than an HK clone.

      Delete
    4. Yeah, the price is rediculous, but with our temperature extremes here I think it'll be one less thing to worry about (they aren't destroyed by freezing or high temps).

      They are easy to replicate (I saw one guys page where he wrote a couple of white papers detailing his own research. Getting Ni(III) or Ni(II) oxides for impregnation into hot nickel or iron plates doesn't seem that difficult ... obtaining the materials was a challenge for him ... (he got cells creating approximately sub 1 V or so, but not a lot of capacity). There are a lot of easy plans out there.

      The only difficulty I see in it is investing the time to do it and obtaining the materials for construction >100 Ahr of homemade batteries with enough cells to generate 12-24V. I'm too swamped at the moment with the whole continuing collapse of the global economy and NTE issues. That's a project to give to the kids when they are 10 ("Hey, build this for Dad....this will count as your science curriculum for the week.") Thank goodness for the Internet at the present time. The wealth of information available to stockpile to recreate 100 year techs is everywhere and easy to store, without it, you'll stumble into the fact that Edison owned a company of hundreds of workers who job it was to tweak and invent and try hundreds, if not thousands, of variations to get something to work.

      The guy who published his website asks for donations, as its kindof his hobbie, but even has has to play/experiment/re-do his trials a bunch of times before figuring out the right materials to use in the right way.

      Oh well, Thank you Grandma for providing a 100-year lifespan battery, and thank you Exxon for sucking out enough dead dinosaurs to ship a 1000-pound battery from China.

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    5. Planned product death has permiated to such a degree that you can't even recreate ( easily ) older easier stuff. The battery is just one example of how quality is easier on resources in the long run but abandoned for easy profit.

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    6. Yes homemade nickle iron batteries and plans for them exist. But nickle isnt cheap, and the homemade batteries are not as efficent as industrial produced ones. since the batteries can easily last decades and (lye?), oil, and distilled water are all that is needed to maintain them - so why make your own? yes expensive but you can buy on a sort of lay away from 'Zap works' (located in montana - google it) and once you get it you just need to maintain it, and put power in it, for the rest of your life.

      -Grey

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