Monday, July 22, 2013

wheat cycle and PEEno16


WHEAT CYCLES AND PEEno16

 

I plowed through “Cycles”, the 1940’s book on business cycles, not totally impressed but mildly interested enough that the $10 price wasn’t a waste.  The problem was that the place I saw a reference for the book, “Babylon’s Banksters” ( the first book of that authors I ended up being disappointed with ), had pretty much covered every aspect of the book already.  But I did get one gem out of the book ( sometimes that is enough to make your time and money worth it ) and that was the Wheat Cycle.  Some poor schlub, probably thinking if he researched dusty archives for a few years he could get tenure at a college and have a lifetime access to Young Strange ( personally I don’t know what guys see in much younger women.  When they have the same generational fashion statement as my daughter it is hard for me to generate any sexual attraction- for obvious reasons ) complied 700 years of wheat prices in England.  And behold, they quite closely followed a 54 year cycle.  If you were just looking back through a short two centuries such as in the US or just back to the start of colonialism, this wouldn’t be such a wonderful thing ( being obviously skewed ).  But come on!  After seven centuries you pretty much have to take this cycle seriously ( it wasn’t just sunspot activity thought to be the cause but other solar effects also such as ozone or whatnot ). 

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A short exercise will validate this cycle for homegrown use.  The book was published in the 40’s.  Using their previous cycle numbers, the low commodity price years are 1790, 1844, 1898 and the high point for prices was 1817, 1871 and 1925.  Which calculates out to low price years 1952 and 2006.  And high peaks in commodity prices at 1979 and 2033.  If you’ll recall the 70’s inflation and the Eighties recovery, 1979 as the year prices peaked isn’t too far off ( these are cycles, not 100% accurate year forecasts.  Off by a small margin does not invalidate the theory over the long haul ).  Also, what has been going up since the previous mid decade?  Food prices.  Totally discounting Peak Oil, just the Wheat Cycle alone would tell you all you want to know about grain prices in your lifetime.  The next twenty years are going to see ever increasing wheat prices.  Buy now!  Do not futz around, do not pause to scratch yourself vigorously.  Buy now.

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PEEno16

PREPPER EMERGENCY ESSENTIALS

Wool

 

Most Marshmallow People have no conception of cold or hot weather.  They visit the South and ponder how anyone could live without air conditioning ( you can’t say, “they just did but couldn’t have enjoyed it”.  Look at population densities worldwide.  Most folks live in very hot and humid climates.  It seems to be our natural default preference.  Extra crops/better plant weather equals less work earning calories ).  They run from a warm house to a warm car and then into a warm workplace/shopping establishment and proclaim “Oooo, it’s cold out there”.  Meaning, they briefly experienced a short duration of temperatures below 74 degrees.  They have no friggin clue what cold really is.  I read a news account one time of a power outage where the outside worker they interviewed had piled on his cotton clothing in several layers and was bitching about the cold.  Obviously, his previous work had had lots of breaks in front of a heater, since he had no clue how to dress for the cold.  Layers are the right idea, but you need wool.

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Most people, as kids, were forced to wear wool and experienced its itchy quality ( the better, more expensive wool doesn’t itch.  Back in The Day, I can’t imagine many parents looking at a soon to be outgrown piece of clothing and thinking it needed to be top price high quality ).  I’m not bothered by it anymore, but if you are you merely need a non-wool layer of clothing underneath the outer layers of wool.  Not rocket science.  Wool keeps sheep alive in winter, long before heated barns came around ( even in the barns in extreme weather locations, when the loft of hay is the insulation and the body heat is enough to keep a well-built barn from getting too cold, the poor guys still need that wool coat to stay comfortable ).  Wool is THE winter gear.  You can buy it cheap at thrift stores ( stockpile much more than you think you’ll need- at a buck or three a sweater it makes a very good barter item.  It will take several winters for homegrown industries to emerge ).  You can repair it yourself, make it yourself and it is natural and renewable ( and, it is a bit fire resistant and slightly anti-bacterial ).  And, along with a feather comforter, several wool blankets will eliminate the need for nighttime winter heating in the house ( feel free to pass along some of your savings to me ). 

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The only trick with wool is you can’t hang it to dry or use the dryer.  Use a very mild soap, such as Woolite or dish soap and hand wash the garment.  In the winter, I switch out sweaters every month and then if my last sweater takes a week to dry it’s no big deal.  Gently hand wring out and LAY THE PIECE DOWN FLAT.  Do not hang.  You can lay a towel over it and blot to help dry.  Perhaps keep changing the underneath towel.  Keep out of the sun and do not apply direct heat.  Let it dry out on its own.  And beware, the shape it stays wet will be the shape it stays dry.  Which is why you don’t hang it, it will elongate and distort.  I can comfortably work out in fifteen degrees with only two sweaters to keep my torso warm ( obviously, other parts need other things to keep warm ), a thin wool sweater under a medium wool sweater over a thin shirt.  As long as the wind doesn’t force me to put a shell over them, and with modest movement, I stay toasty. That is the magic of wool ( leather is the best outer layer.  It shields from wind and moisture and has warming properties itself.  My gloves are now leather mitten shells, with wool mitten inserts.  By getting rid of my hand brake bicycle and going with a pedal brake I can wear these much warmer but bulky hand protectors ).

END

 

10 comments:

  1. Even down here in the land of sweat, I prefer thin wool socks in my boots. The wicking factor is much better with wool. Even tho you don't advocate high dollar apparel, I find wool socks made by "Scent Lock" brand to be very good as they come with silver threads woven into the wool which kill all bacteria and keep your feet from stinking and also will help prevent foot fungus. They are spendy at $15 a pair but well worth the investment.

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    1. Since $6 a pair is about the cheapest you can get for wool socks ( I won't buy the 8% content or something similar. I want 50, 60% wool minimum content ) I don't think $15 is all that bad if they work so much better.

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  2. Grew up wearing wool here in northern NH. Keeps you warm even when wet.

    Your mitten solution is standard practice in these parts.

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    1. Dammit man! I wished you shared a few years earlier. Cold ass hands on the worst mornings every winter before I figured this out on my own. Reinventing the wheel.

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  3. I have odorous feet. I remember reading a horror story and this guy's special ability was to detect peoples' nature by their PSI odor. Gun oil smell means that guy is a gun nut. In any case, my PSI odor would be feet. Not sure what that means...

    When I get home from work, my cats rub their face scent glands on my bare feet. I'm not sure if they are trying to cover their scent with my foot odor or they are taking one for the team!

    I believe I have established that I have odorous feet. That being said I have used the USGI black cotton silver threaded socks and also worn light wool(non-silvered)socks here in Central Florida. The cotton silver threads do kill the odors but still get very wet. The light wool(non-silvered)socks also kill the odors but there is hardly any dampness. I think I could wear the wool socks for a full day with comfort. There is no way I'm getting more then 8 hours out of the cotton silvered threaded socks.

    Wool is the way to go. Get the Merino wool if possible. Not itchy
    for my delicate feet!!

    If you are pinching pennies (or CHEAP, like me), you probably might get away with non-silvered wool socks.

    Gil

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    1. With cats, and I could be wrong here, it seems a friendly greeting is a face rub. That's what the wife gets. I get the veer-sharply-for-hip-rub-only. Of course, the wife feeds the cat so it could be begging. But it seems ALL animals are drawn to her so I'm thinking it is a taunt to me.

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  4. Yes on the wool for winter wear Jim.

    I picked up two pairs of 100% wool slacks for $7.00 ea. They're dress slacks, practically brand new, and originally, I'm sure that they would have cost no less than $100.00 a pair? The only problem is that they're kind of thin, so some long johns would be necessary to wear underneath; that, and they're dry clean only. But I think that your wool washing method work well? One of the problems with washing wool is that it looses it shape, and once that happens, it stays that way. Your solution addresses this, and is something to keep in mind for post collapse laundry solutions. Wearing long johns or undergarments (Thermax or polypropylene wick moisture and are washer friendly) would also minimize the washing times, as then, you're mostly just dealing with surface dirt.

    My brother pointed out that even though the military surplus wool pants are bit more expensive, they're also thicker, last longer, and can be machine washed, so in the end, they're probably a better bargain than the thrift store pants. I think he's right.

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    1. I can comfortably wear cotton slacks in the teens. So I would imagine wool slacks, even thin, would improve on that. I do wear real thick wool surplus pants when the temps go below double digits. Of course, for me, my legs are the last thing to get cold.

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  5. The government reports on the grain crops are bogus. They are intentionally suppressing commodity prices (in other words, lieing). Wheat is the number one grain in the world and supplies are tight. This years crop has been poor so far, most of the Hard Red Winter Wheat has been harvested. Left to harvest are HRSW, Durum Wheat, and SRSW. The crop was planted late and yields will be down. Added to these issues, our crop here in the good old USA mostly goes to China, reducing the amount available for consumption here.The Federal government has been printing money for years, now they can also print Wheat! Buy now!

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    1. Or, better yet. Don't bother buying anything. Frack oil will last forever. Seend me your prep money and I'll buy preps in your name ( non-redeemable ). NO! You idiot! Buy wheat NOW!!!! I was being sarcastic about sending me all of it. Just 75%.

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