Friday, July 12, 2013

surviving the last crisis


SURVIVING THE LAST CRISIS

 

Before we begin today, I think I had better update my loyal minions on a potential problem.  As you all know, my first forecast collapse date was last summer.  I just knew that come the last of my child support payments the market would collapse, the banks would close and the oil would dry up and we would all start to die, and for no other reason that it seems that the Gods themselves hate me and wish to cause me no end of grief.  Well, obviously nothing happened which I attribute to said deities being asleep at the wheel or occupied with someone else they could harass without end.  So, with nothing better to go on my back-up forecast was that when the wife’s hospital bill was done THEN the collapse would occur (  suspiciously, the wife got sick a month or two after the child support was done, in effect substituting for that payment when combined with pay cuts at work and a falling off of my writing income ).  I was never real happy about that guess but I didn’t have much better.  I mean, when everything revolves around you, what else can factor in when guessing about such things?  At first, the damn fool Churchies thought the universe revolved around the earth.  Then, the idiot scientists thought the earth revolved around the sun.  Both are wrong as can be, cause the universe revolves around me.  Anywho, I’ve now figured out a better, more realistic collapse date.  Jack In The Box, a very decent if overpriced fast food place on the west coast, is finally opening a store here in Elko.  Since that news is the most exciting thing that has happened to me in a very long time, I can be sure that the Gods have taken note.  The collapse will happen the day it opens so I can’t have my deep fried fifty cent tacos.  You have been warned ( sorry, I have no timeframe.  The frame/foundation went up quick but things have slowed since then ).

*

I was looking through Rawles this morning and was reading the article on The Cowboy Survivalist or some damn thing.  A gal was making a case for the Texas Hill Country being as good if not better than the Rawles Redoubt.  Nothing new here, move along, this has already been advocated.  But what got my attention was the built in subconscious assumptions she carried.  Here you are in dry country, chosen by Germans over a century ago ( close to two? ) not because it was God’s Country but because no-damn-body else wanted it.  Vicious Indian country with weather sent from Hades directly, the settlers were pretty much there for the affordable land ( probably as in free ).  Okay, I get that the character of the people was forged by the hard land and their descendants are the better for it today.  But, as with ALL Americans, they are still the products of their day.  Still marshmallow people, just not as soft or gooey.  Look, I’m not dissing on folks who are working hard for semi-independence.  It is a worthwhile goal, a great lifestyle.  But that doesn’t make them survivalists.  Everybody is tootling around in pick-up trucks with huge oil tanks at home for heating.  The nearest grocery store is thirty miles away.  Their world, as good as it is being MORE independent is still very much DEPENDENT on oil.  In short, they are all set to survive the last crisis, that of the Arab Oil Embargo.

*

When we imported single digits for our oil, we were by and large energy independent.  Yet when the Arabs screwed with “our” oil, and our energy supply contracted five percent, our economy went into a crash and burn.  Now look at today, without an industrial sector like last time, and a two or three percent decline in energy results in a situation worse in a lot of ways than the 30’s Great Depression.  And our imports went up to nearly 70% ( before ratcheting down slightly with Frac Oil ).  This crisis is NOT like the last crisis.  We won’t have the North Sea oil, or the Alaskan oil or soon thereafter Russian oil flooding the market to save us.  When you live thirty miles from the store, and oil supply becomes problematic, you are in a bit of a situation.  Okay, you’re in cattle country.  And everyone has horses.  So, no one should starve, given some ability to transition back to animals working the farms.  And yet, with an acre going for $5-10k ( about what the junk land goes for here ), how many folks are truly independent?  The banks own most of their land.  You think a cow you own on the banks land makes you independent? 

*

This is the basic problem with Yuppie Scum Survivalists and Homesteaders.  They are preparing for the last crises, when we merely had a hiccup in the oil supply.  Stockpiling worked, because you merely needed to get over the hump to a once again functioning economy.  You would think folks would know better, with the entire country experiencing a lot of people ( odds are great, someone or someones you know ) who are underwater in their homes, how illusionary ownership is when your financial partner is a bank.  But they just doubling down on the two old tired tiers, semi-auto weapons and more debt for the retreat.  People are buying into the short term emergency/back to business as usual at the soonest paradigm ( which everyone shamelessly sells, even the tree huggers ), as evidenced by this reader submitted article at Rawles ( and, by the by, his newest book is now available for pre-order ).  Baby Jesus himself weeps copiously.  If you follow the herd, it will take you over the cliff with them.  Stop trying to wish Oil Lange Leben.

END

15 comments:

  1. 10k an ACRE!?!
    sure I've seen higher, but if you really look you can find like I found 40acres at 20k
    http://www.landcentral.com/land-for-sale/montana/7340.html

    Heck there are even jobs within a weekly commuting distance of that peice. Sure the jobs are part of the oil boom that is going to go bust; but a trailer, tolerance for cold weather, and willingness to work your body, will get you decent pay and when the bust hits you move on out to your 40acres that you have been improving on the weekends that should already be paid off thanks to the oil money you have been earning.

    And there are still cheaper peices of land out there.

    Water isnt a huge concern if you are conservatice, recycle your greywater, and use composting toilets (search earthships, and humanure).

    Spend lots of $ on isulation of course as it will get cold.

    land is still affordable if you can get employment and are willing to compromise on the land.

    Improving the land is hard work, lots of which is better done by machine, but doing as much by hand as you can (financially, time, and condition) means that you improve your body condition to be better than the average marshmellow.

    Jeeze, who except _rich_ yuppie scum near the cities is buying land at 10K an acre?!?

    -Grey

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    Replies
    1. Well, to be fair, if that is where you grew up...my issue is that it is crap land. One acre to live is one thing, but to buy for cattle at that price quite another.

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    2. oh sure 40 acres isnt worth a sneeze on a hankie for a ranch or 'farm' (of hay or monoculture for profit sort) in the great plains. But its plenty for a garden or the beginings of a heard. sufficent to keep body and soul together while we transition and then you could get local employement with the surviving ranchers after.
      sure its still 'junk land for the area but slightly better than the parched mojave. and much cheaper than 10k an acre they pay on the coasts and appleachians- and a lot fewer neighbors than even where you are. (more water + fewer neighbors = better survival odds long term).
      aka small step up from 'junk' land but still affordable for the working poor.
      Its best to buy near where you have community ties and employment if you can afford it, but if you cant afford it find a place you can fit in (_that_ parcel is likely on tribal land).

      -Grey

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    3. Well, the water situation isn't all that better than here, other than rainfall. So, with catchment, sure. Otherwise, with all the drought, a well is risky. And, even at a mere $1k an acre, that is a huge chunk to get without a bank.

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  2. True, but you forget the proximity to Mexico, most of their population is here already (with more coming). So when the World Unhinges, we Texans have a head start to get BACK to Mexico, before they arrive, getting the best beaches.

    Eveellle Gringos - Woot Woot!

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    Replies
    1. I like how you think. Give em west Texas perhaps, in exchange for east and south Mexico. Sounds fair.

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  3. Not very prevalent on the East Coast, Jack-n-the-Box mostly makes news when they have some sort of food poisoning case, or have to shut down when they fail their Health inspection.

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    Replies
    1. Well, you guys do have Save A Lot, so I think the cosmic scales balance, customer-benefit wise

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  4. "The frame/foundation went up quick but things have slowed since then..." The gods chortled and slipped you a wet willie, Jim!

    Whilst you watch the J-I-B construction fuddle about; with baited hunger pangs, the gods will send a class 3 astoroid(sp) to destroy life as we know it. But don't worry! We are all equally screwed. Misery loves company...and deep fried fifty cent long pork tacos!

    What was the question, again?

    Gil

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    Replies
    1. Hmmmm. For a mere fifty cents ( current purchasing power, of course ) I might eat long pork tacos. But only if they add real cheese ( no processed can crap ) and tomatoes- not GMO. After the collapse, obviously. Mexican seasoning might just be the way to go hiding the origins of mystery meat. Yummmmmy, tamales!

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  5. Oh good lord.... you gave J W Comma Rawles soon-to-be-published book a plug.

    Puh-freaking-leaze!

    He produces some of the most worthless, recycled (recycled from his own earlier books) drivel in the genre.

    Unworthy of you to try to foist it on the unsuspecting.

    Bad Bison.

    No biscuit.

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    Replies
    1. That, and he's sickeningly PC, which is why I stopped following that site.

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    2. Just a heads up to those minions who want to read. I didn't endorse it, mind you. And remember, even if the books are unworthy, if you read his blog you still need to support him. It's only fair.

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    3. Just to follow up on my original comment of incredulity regarding your giving JWcommaR's book a plug, and to address your statement:

      "And remember, even if the books are unworthy, if you read his blog you still need to support him. It's only fair."

      While I don't disagree with you often (how could I?), I do disagree with that.

      Reading his blog isn't often reading him (thank goodness).

      He makes oodles and bundles of money from the advertisers on his blog. And those advertisers are there because he has an enormous page-hit readership - as he is proud to display on his blog statistics.

      The way I see it, my visits there help him to attract those advertisers, so there's my support.

      Unlike yourself, his writing is by and large uninteresting and if not for the the contributing writers that he attracts with promises of much wampum (in the form of prizes), there'd be little reason to even bother to go there at all. Certainly not to read him rehashing things that may have had some merit in the distant past - like his constantly reedited, reissued, boring and preachy novels.

      Fair would be supporting your site, which I do on occasion by venturing to Amazon through here.

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    4. OK, I gotta say you've thought this one through much better than I. Being a reader would support him through the ads. Hey, now I feel better about myself, too. Yes, his universe is one I disagree with. But if you do get entertainment from it, even without agreeing, than his books are just escapism. I didn't love his two sequals. The Jews For Chist section was agonizing. And I could poke holes through the whole thing. But, it kept me reading and I was entertained. Which is more than I can say about a lot of the Kindle post-apoc books which I couldn't even finish. Perhaps the bar is set low, but he still rises above it. I'll still buy his latest book coming out. I just don't expect it to be top caliber. And thank you for supporting me. I really do appreciate it.

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