Wednesday, July 10, 2013

PEEno14

This one is double the regular length.  Kind of my apology for the last few days.
PEEno14

PREPPER EMERGENCY ESSENTIALS

Top Ten List

As with most “professions”, survival experts try to throw a lot of titles and scarcely relevant education at you in order to obscure the fact that they are, if not overeducated idiots, than certainly guilty of trying to make themselves way more important than is actually the case. There are plenty of professions that are seriously complicated, as you wouldn’t want an idiot to build a bridge over your head or operate on your brain, but far too many could be duplicated by a few dedicated months at the public library and some common sense ( along with a bit of practice ). You could figure out most folks neurosis without needing four to six years of college, for instance, after just living life for awhile ( baring the complication of physical brain damage or chemical imbalance in this instance of course ). Along with child labor laws, professional licensing and compulsory education are simply ways for workers to force up the cost of their labor to an artificial level ( I have no objection to using this device to compel corporations to pay a fair and living wage, but not for blocking entry to otherwise qualified individuals ). Lucky for you, since Survivalist Expert is an undesired occupation by both our government and banker masters ( and their corporate toadies ), there is no barrier to entry artificially erected and I can bluff and bloviate my way into their ranks to disperse my wisdom. And so, the Top Ten List. What will be a minimum at an affordable rate ( and, really, pretty much ALL you would need ). It isn’t the best, but it is a means of cheaply getting what you need to keep you alive. Not happy or comfortable. Alive. You know, surviving.

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1) Food. We would all love to wake up to dried eggs, canned bacon and reconstituted orange juice after the Apocalypse. Lunch an MRE and dinner freeze dried beef stroganoff. And that would only cost you about $20 a day. You can easily afford that as long as you only plan on surviving a few weeks. For the average Survival Sam, you have to set your sights way below that. Wheat, beans and lard. Sprout some of the wheat ( throw in some vitamin pills just to make sure- a five year supply of multi-vitamin one a day pills will cost about the same as one #10 can of freeze dried Yak Testicles ) and you have a complete diet. Wheat for the bulk of your calories, throw in some beans every day to make it a complete protein when added to the grain. And lard for the needed fat ( if your body doesn’t have fat to heat itself in the winter, you die. Generations of marshmallow people living in central heated buildings have forgotten this lesson as they advocate avoiding fat and eating nothing but bunny food ). A pound of wheat a day, half a pound of beans. That is two thousand calories. It used to cost 75 cents a day just a few years ago. Throw in a pound of lard a week in wintertime and the cost was another fifteen cents. Now of course the cost is a bit over a buck ( and the longer you wait the more it will go up ). Even so, if you can spend $80 a month on a cell phone and the same on cable, you can spend $400 for a year of storage food.

2) Grain Grinder. Get as your primary grinder a Corona mill. Made in Mexico and costing as much as $75. But it should last a lifetime. Of course, just to make sure, get yourself several back-ups of the cheaper models. Those cost $25 each. The back-ups are just like additional years of food storage. You don’t need it right away but make plans to get as soon as possible. The great thing is, you no longer need to shop for Chinese made grinders as your secondary units. They are now being offered from Mexico ( which, going by my experience with yard tools, offers much better quality metal than China. Chinese buildings fall down in the wind. Their assault rifles have sears made from such crappy metal they go into full auto in runaway mode. Their files are softer metal than what they are meant to grind down. Shop outside China if you can ).

3) Water Filter. There are plenty of cheap ways to purify water. A Dakota Hole or Rocket Stove ( if you buy a store made rocket stove, I reserve the right to review your purchase and your permission to beat you about the head and shoulders with the unit. If you need a substantial unit, bricks and mortar are far cheaper. If you need mobility, use a damn coffee can which costs nothing ) will heat water using scrap wood available anywhere. You can use an old two liter soda bottle to get a UV purifying effect. I like the Berky ceramic elements in a homemade filter. Sure, it costs $65. But it is a high grade filter and will last up to ten thousand gallons plus. That isn’t a whole lot of money for what you are getting ( use the other methods while traveling, the Berky unit at home when you don’t want any smoke from a fire showing ). While not a Must Have purchase, it sure increases options and increases safety on your main consumable.

4) Rifle. You need to eat and to drink and you need to arm yourself to increase your chances you can do so in relative peace. It is silly to only focus on firearms to the exclusion of a huge reserve of food, but it is equally silly to dismiss the importance of arming yourself. I understand the majority of survivalists would rather cease breathing than be unarmed ( how the guys in California or other socialist crapholes where the citizens are disarmed serfs do it escapes my comprehension ) but you know there are always some pot smoke induced brain dead long hair hippie punks out there ( and Amish ) who go through all the trouble of securing their food supplies and give nary a thought to taking over protecting it from the police at the appropriate time. This section is for the novice survivalist, unsure as to what all this fuss over guns is about. No, one gun doesn’t do it all. Yes, you need different kinds for different tasks. But, as with most things in life, reality might dictate you only get one. Choose a rifle. Those that pick a handgun because of concealment need to wake up and get the hell out of the city. If your location isn’t filled with good ol boys racing down dirt roads with a rifle rack in the back of their pick-up truck window, you probably live in an area to too dense of a population. Get out NOW. It was rock solid advice back in the 70’s when those dirty commie bastards were targeting your urban area with thermonuclear weapons and it is good advice now when ghetto dwellers are targeting you for the coming riots and FEMA is targeting you for the concentration camps ( and TSA will be targeting anyone trying to leave during either event- yes, Virginia, the Feds WILL force you back into the race war they instigated ). You don’t need a super deluxe Rambo semi auto killing machine. An affordable bolt action will work just fine ( if you still feel you need a semi, kill its owner by bushwhacking at the appropriate time post collapse ). Get it in common hunter caliber. NOT common military caliber which is the most expensive, first to run out round. Which brings us to ammunition. Don’t think of a rifle and its ammo as a single item. You need to actually consider the ammunition first, with the firearm secondary. A rifle is a club without ammunition, and the ammunition will cost five times the amount of the rifle. Pick your ammunition first and then your rifle. And buy the heck out of it now. Think of the rifle and the ammo as an old computer. A computer used to be quickly obsolete, and if you wanted your money’s worth out of it you needed to quickly buy all the software and components and accessories for it at the same time you bought the machine. Because soon none would be available after upgrades. The same with ammunition. You must buy it soon after if not before the rifle, because the way things are going you might not have a chance later on down the road.

5) Fire. Do a little research on homemade sparkers ( steel on rock ), but in the meantime you need to have a magnifying glass and try to start most of your fires during the day. Stockpile plenty of matches, and lighters, and in the meantime husband them by using the glass. Offer to de-lint all the Laundromat dryers when not in use and save the heck out of that for tinder. Eventually the best strategy is going to be never letting a flame go out, having an eternal fire or candle, but that will be years down the road when you start having a surplus again. Also, short term, use a welders sparker. You can find them at Wal-Mart.

6) LED Lights. You are going to need illumination. If you don’t plan ahead for this you will be reduced to using beeswax or tallow for candles. The problem with candles, besides crappy light and fire danger, is that the bees are all disappearing and you don’t want to sacrifice edible fat for lighting, especially in the winter. Now, granted, eventually we will all be forced back to using candles. But you want to be able to postpone that day as long as possible. Buy as many affordable LED’s as possible now while they are cheap. While I swear by 12v LED’s, quite comfortable to read by, in my experience so far 12v batteries don’t last anywhere near as long as the portable ones ( AA, AAA, D and C sizes ). When using AAA batteries, I have a clip on reading light. For general use, I have AA battery mini-lamps. Those are a bit specialized and hence more expensive. The real cheap lights are mainly flashlights and lanterns. Not great for lighting large areas, but really after the collapse you will thank your lucky stars to have any source of light, however bad compared to full room lights we enjoy now.

7) Solar Recharger. The small paperback book size solar rechargers you need for those portable batteries are about $25. I would try to buy more than one. If you stay with devices that only use the A sizes you will be much better off. Those recharge in hours rather than days as is the case with D’s and C’s. And the batteries are cheaper, one buck rather than three. Per battery. If all this, the lights and the chargers and the batteries, are too expensive for you, just go with the garden solar lights. One buck each for the whole thing- charger, battery and light. Not as high a quality, but you can easily buy a dozen for plenty of back-ups.

8) Wool. I wouldn’t buy anything else but wool for my winter clothing needs. Natural. Fire resistant. Warmer. Repairable. Cheap if bought used. It is hard to beat an outer leather cover over wool to defeat a hard cold wind. One of the few items you can duplicate after the collapse on the same tech level, but you still want it stockpiled since you have no idea how long it will be before trade resumes. And, you’ll need your clothes immediately. You can bet, come a collapse, it will happen during winter. That’s just Murphy’s Law, not a conspiracy theory ( although, if it is to be engineered, I’d vote for the timing to be winter, to maximize the death count using less bullets or railcars for transport ).

9) Knives. The ultimate back-up that never goes out of style. The stainless steel are cheap, and need extra continual sharpening. But nice as a “store and forget” item. Real steel are better quality but need regular maintenance. And are more costly ( except in some cases such as the Swedish ones ).

10) Shelter. Not as complicated as it need be. The one item you can’t beat is plastic sheeting. Not tarps, which are overpriced crap. The heavy thickness used by construction guys. Yes, $60 a roll. But you can build a lot of shelters with that. The one building item nature can’t duplicate so easily.

And that is it. Pretty much all you need. The common denominator besides affordability is that they are a modern product, cheaply acquired, and won’t be available at all in some cases or near as cheap in other cases after the Apocalypse. Acquire now. And don’t be led astray as others try to deviate much from the basic list.

END


All of my links and information: http://jamesmdakin.blogspot.com/2013/05/info-page.html

 

26 comments:

  1. Fort McClellan Troops Poisoned by Monsanto

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XAhQLB2Xt38

    radiation and nasty chemicals, oh boy!

    crapola dude. i was there in 1985.

    i hope your hair isn't danger.lol

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  2. Thought you might find this article on Cargo Bikes interesting....

    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887324328204578572011343756542.html?mod=trending_now_5

    JP in MT

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    1. $3k. Three Friggin Grand. SUCK MY WRINKLED LIVER SPOTTED FECAL MATTED BLOOD SMEARED ASS YOU YUPPIE SCUM BIKE COMPANIES!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! For $500 you get a good bike and a good purpose built trailer. And that is if you don't do it yourself but buy off the shelf.

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  3. You should look at the ceramic filters that the monolithic dome company sells. They are down to $13 each. These are the ones to usd for making your own 5 gallon bucket water filter.

    http://shop.monolithic.com/products/just-water-ceramic-drip-filter

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    1. The link says $25 each. Plus, didn't I look at this at one time and figure the cost per gallon were higher? I might be wrong, although that rings a bell.

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    2. Change it over to China made (from US).....

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    3. There is a drop down bar on the site. Not sure if you covered it before. Only been reading for 6 months or so.

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    4. I trust you've gone back and read everything, thus confirming my greatness and convincing yourself to tithe 10% gross to me ( strickly for the cat and wife of course ).

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    5. Even at $13, is the capicity several thousand gallons or just several hundred?

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    6. I'll see if i can find out. Oh and yes lord bison, i am already a loyal minion.

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    7. All you meander upon my Pit Of Vapid Bloviation are trapped and must remain Royal Minions for all eternity! ( insert Dr. Evil diabolical laugh )

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    8. Ok, here is what it says...I will bow down to the final say of Lord Bison and how he interprets this..

      Performance Features:

      Easy installation
      Good flow rate / 14 to 17 gallons a day (gravity flow)
      Up to 60-70 gallons per day (pressure flow)
      Filter will accept water from floods, lake, rain, well, tap, river or stream
      Semi/Annual filter replacement Cleansable with clean damp cloth
      Shelf life is extended by shaking filter every 3-4 months to loosen media inside and prevent packing
      Once in use, filter will last 6-8 months

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    9. OK, so 4k gallons. The $15 filter, if I recall correctly, is 4 microns filtering. The $25 is 2 microns. If you sacrifice performance, 12k gallons cost $45. Otherwise, at 2 microns, you pay $75, which is more expensive than the Berky.

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  4. I'd humbly add soap, both for hygiene and also for desinfecting wounds.
    Why stockpile it ? Because, unlike several top ten items (like guns & ammo), the item will be used every day. Every. Day. Simply because everyone in your group goes to the loo at least once a day (if they don't, be wary, they might be Communists or something).
    A *daily use* by *everyone* means it's a continuous erosion. You have to stockpile a lot of it.

    I'd also add the capacity to create a fire. Of course, some kind of lens is useful, but I guess you often have to make a fire *at night* (warth, possibly light as well). This as well is used often, so it's better to stockpile it.

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    1. I'd agree with soap but for a differant reason. You can't spare the fat for a time. I might have to ammend for fire.

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    2. Pretty simple remedy for fire really. A costco pack of Bic lighters, and a box kitchen matches (Not those crappy, paper book matches, but the wooden type).

      Amend this with a few good lenses for daylight use (Try to start all fires when the sun is shining to preserve the former) and a pack of ferrorods for back up. I got a 3 pack of military style ferrorods from the sportsman's guide for $14.00, and they last a long time. Learn to make charcloth, and acquire, or make a hardened carbon steel striker (Track of the wolf sells them) from a file, and you have the traditional flint (Many other hard rocks will work in place of flint) and steel striker way of making fire. If you own a flintlock gun, you also have this method at your disposal, which is why the mountain men favoured the flintlock long after the advent of the percussion gun.

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    3. I just can't believe I forgot to add that to the top ten.

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  5. In regard to plastic sheets, you might want to consider Dura Skrim Plastic sheeting because it's very weather resistant and also can come in opaque or clear varieties although clear is more common in your big box stores. Skrim is reinforced with a webbing. I used Skrim and regular polyethylene in one of my outdoor products. After 3 years, the Skrim lasted and is still strong. After one summer, the poly disintegrated. I replaced the poly with Skrim. No problems since.

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  6. I never heard of Dura Skrim before - very cool! A bit pricey, but if they ain't making it no mo', worth its weight in gold. Thanks Unknown.

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    1. Hold on! Isn't that how they get you to buy a $500 grinder!?

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  7. Yea, probably. We've used the cheap HF blue tarps for shade on our backyard chicken tractor and within 6 months, its pretty shredded. Cheap to replace, yes, but when replacing it is no longer an option . . .

    Fwiw, my grinder choice is the Mexican made Estrella, purchased back in 2009. We grind our own corn for our chicken feed and its been up to the task with only a little wear. Buying at least one spare would be a good idea.

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    1. What about sheets of metal? Pait or tar would be cheaper annually than a tarp. Lately, as the whores anally violate us up to the elbow as they reach for our wallets, duct tape and tarps are two very over-rated items now. Quality is WAY down.

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    2. Where I'm at (south Texas Gulf Coast), humidity does a real number on metals, they require good priming / painting to maintain longevity. Might be a good option in the desert, where humidity is of little / no concern.

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    3. What about thin plywood or fiberglass panels? I'm just saying, there has got to be a better way than tarps.

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