Tuesday, July 9, 2013

2 of 2 today

THIRD WEEVIL STANDING

I used to admit to having no clear unifying theme to an article now and then, presenting a hodgepodge of ideas instead, but have now come to the conclusion that since everything I utter is pure gold the failure to solidify a common denominator must be your fault instead of mine. Hence, today we talk about three subjects that you alone can deduce has any relevance to each other. The book “The Third Bullet” by Stephen Hunter, a new take on the Kennedy assassination in fiction form. “The Last Ape Standing”, a book on the four to seven million year evolution of ape into man. And new ( to me anyway ) ways to preserve your wheat against the assault of weevils. I love Stephen Hunter, even after admitting he wrote some real dudes there for a time ( even though I admire authors trying to break out of commercial molds, I admit sometimes that is a terrible idea. For better or worse, folks want Bob The Nailer sniping action and Hunter delivers it quite well ). If you’ve never read it, get his “Dirty White Boys”, memorable for its opening where the character admits to having the largest junk in jail, not including African Americans of course.

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The Third Bullet is some of his best work, so he is definitely back on track, being much more than simple action adventure and having quite the depth to it ( for instance, a discussion of fiction types almost seems to parody his work, but that itself might be a spoof of a parody ), at least insofar as normal best sellers go. As fascinating as the third bullet theory was, a Carinco bullet was shaved down three one thousands of an inch to fit a modern bolt, hollowed out and the nose lead exposed to form an exploding bullet which yielded ONLY caliber forensic evidence in the metallic residue to match Oswald’s rifle, shot by a true sniper as opposed to Oswald’s mere marksman level of expertise, I didn’t buy the explanation to explain the timing of the event. Since it was impossible to coordinate an assassination attempt in the mere two days from route announcement to actual arrival, Hunter assumes a rather fanciful explanation, to my eyes. Of course, to his credit, the explanation fits as close as possible if you discount all conspiracy theories which many folks might think the most logical course of action. I quite enjoyed the book, but it did nothing to dissuade me from my conviction the Banksters were the ultimate benefactors if not the actual immediate instigators which to me seems probable.

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Last Ape Standing was a bit overpriced and a tad difficult to read, but it had plenty to interest me in anthropology more than evolution. One such is what is often overlooked, the brain as survival mechanism. Not that I’ve ignored the brain as an essential tool. Rather, I’ve favored more physical attributes in sexual attraction over intellectual. Yet, creativity it seems is a strong reactor to the opposite sex, signifying advanced brain development. While here I am thinking protectors and providers made the strongest signals, I ignored the advanced brain being more attractive. Which readily explains what puzzled me, how fiction writers, Pournell and Rawles for instance, were idealized and lionized as survival experts when in point of fact they were merely commercially successful authors with little more than the same retention skills any of us have in research. And does give an alternate explanation in the fictional world of Two And A Half Men TV series as to why Charlie was so irresistible to women. Sure, he had money and looks. But the hotties he always had were obviously mostly gold diggers and it was hard to believe he could literally have monopolized that market with thousands of one night stands. If you are marrying for money, you don’t soil your reputation by humping pretty boys who show no interest in monogamous relationships. Something else was surely at work, and I believe that was an irresistible urge subconsciously brought about by his creative success writing jingles. It wasn’t the money but the means to that money that was attractive to women who otherwise would not have bothered themselves ( hey, what can I say? I’m bored enough right now, given the four day market holiday given no shocking news, to overanalyze a TV sitcom ). And doesn’t that bring to mind an irritatingly parasitic commercial ditty that you can’t shake off? Mine has always been Libby’s canned vegetables. If It’s Libby’s Libby’s Libby’s On The Label Label Label…

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Okay, let’s talk about weevils. This way I can tax write-off the book “Dr. Baders Pest Cures: Natural Solutions To Things That Bug You”. I got my money’s worth, having reduced the ant population in The Pit with borax and coffee grounds, but it never hurts to get another 20% discount ( the book was expensive after shipping ). If you use Dried Hot Chili Peppers in your buckets of wheat, no bugs at all should bother it. Alas, the book didn’t say how much to use. If you don’t like that, go with black pepper. The USDA recommends 500 parts black pepper per million of wheat kernels. Now, my math might be screwed up here and please holler if it is, but I’ve come up with one half ounce black pepper per bucket of wheat. Okay, here is the math. 500 per million is 1 to 2000. Four pounds equals 1800 grams ( I round up to 2000 ). One gram is 1/32 of an ounce. If there is eight units per bucket for each 2000 gram ( four pounds into 32 pounds of wheat per bucket is 8 ), then one half ounce pepper per bucket. If I knuckleheaded it on the math, as I said, please sound off. As the standard metal can of black pepper is about 2 ounces, and about $2, fifty cents worth of black pepper per bucket.

END

11 comments:

  1. ... uh, 28.35 grams per ounce, not 32. Leaving grams out of your calculation makes it a lot simpler. Don't know about you, but I got through school just before "new math" and the metric system came into vogue. Your 1 in 2,000 figure (500 ppm) indicates that you only need a pound (or 16 oz) of pepper per ton of wheat. This works out to 0.256 oz per 32 lb bucket of wheat. So your $2 two ounce can of pepper could handle about 8 buckets at around 25 cents a bucket.

    When I first started typing I was convinced diatomacious earth (DE) would be a lot cheaper than pepper. For comparison, here is pertinent data. USDA recommends 7 lb DE per ton of wheat. That equal about 1.8 oz per 32 lb bucket of wheat. Checking with Amazon, food grade DE goes for under $15 for 10 lb. That works out to about 17 cents of DE per 32 lb bucket of wheat.

    I was wrong. It looks like they are very similar in cost. Now some other smart-alack can check my math.

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    1. I'd go with the other minions recommendation of 1/3 ounce per bucket, only to be on the cautious side. You know, throwing away $10 of wheat because you were cheap and wanted to save eight cents. I missed the metric crap too, thank you Baby Jesus for always watching out for me. And remember the shipping cost on DE. That doubles the cost. Still about the same as pepper after that, and not a bad thing to have on hand anyway in case of last minute stockpiling. But with BP, you can pinch pennies and need only come up with $2 at a time. Kind of six of one, half dozen of the other.

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  2. So is it whole dried chillis or ground up?

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    1. It read, a dried red pepper. So, I'm thinking NOT ground up. I could be wrong. Of course, I would imagine any bread from the wheat with ground up red peppers would burn your backside, if you could even eat the stuff.

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  3. That black pepper tip is worth the price alone.

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    1. Yep, kind of what I thought. See, great minds do think alike.

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  4. Nightshift here....Jim, I am disappointed in you that you would take the opportunity to plant the libbys jingle in my head. There is a reason it was removed from tv years ago.....LOL. Good post as always even if it was on books.

    I can proudly report that My soon to be ex-wife is moved out. I took a hit on the storage foods but everything else is intact. Got to kill the cable and reduce my homeowners insurance to boot. Dont need alot of content insurance when its gone. Thanks babe.

    Lost alot of furniture but have already recovered for free. Couch, loveseat, dining table. Beats having to buy.

    I feel your past pain on child support. I will for a while but I can make it for now and things will hopefully get better as i pay off debt.

    Glad your back posting. Thought you gave up on us minions.

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    1. I'm addicted to yelling at you'all. I can't give it up. Glad you are focusing on the break-up possitives. It's a gold plated bitch otherwise. Best of luck, brother.

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  5. Ok here's my take on the pepper math.

    You need 1 unit of pepper for each 2000 units of wheat.

    1 / 2000 = .0005 units of pepper per unit of wheat.

    So since we buy our pepper in ounces, we'll convert our pounds of wheat to ounces.

    32 lbs * 16 oz per pound = 512 ounces of wheat.

    512 oz * .0005 = .256 oz.

    which as a fraction is larger than 1/4 of an ounce but smaller than 1/3 of an ounce.

    but I would round it up to 1/3 of an oz since this ain't rocket science and we don't need to be all that precise.

    and you can divide your 2 ounce can of pepper into 6 units each equal to 1/3 of an ounce.

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    1. Excellant! Your better math will save the user a lot of pepper-50%. Minions, thank the man.

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  6. http://tinyurl.com/6jdobmz
    I buy one lb cartons of cayenne

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