Tuesday, June 18, 2013

PEEno7

PEEno7

PREPPER EMERGENCY ESSENTIALS

Basic Survival Rifle

A lot has changed in the seven years since I wrote “The Frugal Survivalist” or my five year long Blog, Bison Survival Blog, or even my apocalypse arsenal book “Apocalypse Gun Porn” published last year. Every one of my blog readers adamantly disagrees, but it is my considered strong opinion that the world is in severe ore decline, both such simple metals as steel ( witness the recycling to China and the doubling of steel cans in foods ) and as brass ( copper and nickel ). I contend that brass is NOT in short supply because the numerous Alphabet Soup Agencies are stockpiling. If paramilitary stockpiling would cause shortages, why didn’t conventional military use deplete the supply ( the military has both a larger budget and can waste a heck of a lot in very short order, mainly by killing things ) several years ago during the twin Sandbox wars? I contend that the re-election of The First Royal Kenyan has nothing to do with the shortage. His first crowning didn’t see that, so why should his second? Also, there was absolutely no shortage running up to the election, which makes no sense. Far and away the majority of paranoid gun nuts would buy extra just in case. They wouldn’t wait for the election and then contend with shortages as every Tom, Richard and Harry panic purchased. The only shortage prior to the election was rimfire. 22’s shot up in price and became scarce. An election scare wouldn’t cause plinking rounds to disappear. But the availability of brass would ( there was no longer profit in even a $20 brick ).

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If there was a shortage because of Federal Government Leo’s ( or, Flea’s ) purchases, in this case the Power’s That Be giving us gun control by stealth with unaffordable ammunition, then the big foreign firms would have stepped up production and sold at much higher prices, yet still undercutting domestic manufactures who were maxed out at their facility, and made a yummy profit. Yet, the only increase in supply is from steel cased ammunition, NOT brass. Global brass supply has contracted. Can I prove this? No. I don’t have solid figures of production. This is merely me puzzling out events. I could be wrong, but I always base my advice on worse case scenarios. Not the rosiest or most optimistic. As far as I’m concerned, we are in it for the long haul with ammunition shortages and very high prices. On the one hand this makes my advice on arsenal rifles more timely ( bolt actions, not semi-auto, because after the collapse there will be NO further ammunition. Ever ), yet on another hand, if I am correct ALL my advice on survival guns needs to be updated.

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First and foremost, forget the rimfire unless you already have an ammunition supply. Twenty cent rounds are insane for such an underpowered round. Better to stick with much better stopping power for not too much more a round. Secondly, take another long and hard look at the shotgun. Those rounds are still going for a mere quarter apiece ( because, surprise!!!! No friggin brass, just plastic ) and while the long arm price has gone up because of the general mad rush into firearms ( a little of Obammy, a lot of fear of economic collapse and ghetto cannibals soon emerging afterwards ), it hasn’t doubled like semi-auto’s have. Even at $175, a single shot shotgun is still a screaming bargain. If, and only if, ranges are short where you live, a shotgun can be your only long arm. They also have the benefit of being reloaded long after the collapse, as do all straight wall ammunition. With a shotgun, unlike all other arms, you can reload with paper cases and black powder and non-lead projectiles ( the primers, alas, will still be your weak link ). And, sorry, but World War Two surplus bolt actions are pretty much over and done with. The ammo is cheap still, not much more of an increase of 50% ( whereas conventional military rounds are up 100% or more ), but the rifle supply is so depleted the guns are going for insane premiums. I would never spend $400 for an Enfield. One of the eras best rifles, but they are used and abused. For $100 that was no big deal. But for $400 I can buy a brand new modern bolt action that is so much more accurate ( making your dwindling collection of ammunition count for more kills ) and doesn’t require a separate add-on to use a scope.

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If you can’t rely on a shotgun because of open range ( the lever action also uses a cheaper round, but is also a shorter range and the gun itself is not cheap ), my best advice is to get a bolt action modern rifle, or even a break-open single shot ( lighter weight and simple mechanism ). This isn’t significantly different than my advice way back when, other than the ammunition. It will be increasing in price, supplies will continue to shrink and don’t be surprised if imports are banned ( see how the Chinese guns are still banned, even all these years after Clinton? ). If you don’\t buy what you need now, you are playing with fire. Buy your gun primarily with ammunition in mind. This should be your primary consideration ( although, obviously, factor in the firearm price and the ammo price for a total price, then compare. I wouldn’t sleep well at night if I had under two thousand rounds for a bolt action ). We are already in a collapse, and business as usual will not return, and that includes the good old days of affordable ammunition. So, whatever it costs now, you ain’t seen nothing yet. Bite the bullet, because ammunition is following the supply route of pure honey.

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43 comments:

  1. Agreed.

    I think we will see strides made in reloading steel cased ammo though. You can do it now but it is not really safe to store it and it is harder on your tools overall. Renewed interest in berdan primer reloading is already springing up as well which would make some of that old milsurp brass more appealing.

    Primers however do bring up a question. If we were seeing a brass shortage then primers would be more available, at least the nickel ones. I sill can't find small rifle primers at all which tells me the ammo producers are ordering the hell outta it.

    With a few simple tools, a bunch of stored matchsticks, spent cases and lead to scavenge there will always be firearms. It is pretty basic technology.


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    1. Have you tried matchsticks? I've read the new ones lack the combustion of the old. That could just be disinformation of course. Anyone?

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    2. You need strike anywhere matches but even they are not as good as they used to be.

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    3. In the poor mans Jame's bond, by Kurt Saxon, there was a recipe for fulminate of mercury, the ingredient for making percussion caps, or in this particular case, crude primers. It was a recipe that originally appeared (I believe?) in Dick's encyclopedia of practical receipts and processes. Or "How they did it in the 1870's. "

      I think I'm gonna get that book, since we're heading back to the 1870's.

      http://www.amazon.com/Dicks-encyclopedia-practical-receipts-processes/dp/030810157X

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    4. Any other ideas? Mercury perhaps being both dangerous and hard to find.

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    5. Perhaps stock up on kiddie cap gun caps? Or better yet, figure out the recipe for the formulation?

      CVA, and possibly a few others, make an electronic ignition inline muzzleloader, and I believe that one such model actually uses smokeless powder? Not a long term solution, just an alternative.

      For myself? I plan on hiding in the deep woods, and concentrating on bows, and flintlocks for the long term.

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  2. Save ammo with pull-bolt SKS.
    (The Yugo 59/66 has a gas cutoff.)
    http://www.okiegunsmithshop.com/lvl25.html (many rifles)
    http://tinyurl.com/686z35p (SKS only)


    To make SKS a pullbolt
    See disassembled SKS
    Remove gas piston (part 1) from inside gas
    tube (part 2).
    Replace gas tube.
    (If you do not replace gas tube, gas from gas
    port can blow your eyes out.)
    Make every shot count.
    Ammo is limited.
    One shot kills them dead.
    Save ammo.
    Kill the wounded enemy with a hammer or ax.
    PS ALWAYS TURN KNUCKLES DOWN.
    If knuckles up and you get a slamfire
    the bolt handle will relocate your thumb
    3 inches closer to your elbow.

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    1. Vlad single-handedly made the SKS a viable survival gun again with this tip.

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  3. Been a 12 gauge fan for years, with practice you can get fast at the reloading of them, plus with a shell crimper you can even use black powder and weird objects like rocks and tacks. No rifleling to ruin. Of course you are right about the range but most times they are the last weapons to be banned , might be the perfect choice for a lot of your readers. I've used a New England single shot for years and the only thing I can say bad about it is it kicks like a mule on meth.

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    1. Wouldn't any but a semi kick like that though? Single shots are sexier than semi's though. You'd figure there was a skilled operator behind it rather than a fool with money.

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    2. My all time favourite shotgun was my Stevens single shot 12ga. And yeah, it kicked like a mule with anything but low velocity rounds; and even a box of those would leave a bruise. The H&R deluxe topper model (Though I'm not sure if it's still made?) was chambered for the 3.5" 12ga, and had a steel weight in the butt stock to reduce recoil. Porting is another option to reduce recoil. But of course, if you load your own, you can customize the recoil level.

      I think that you're referring to the "roll crimper"? I have one that I got from ballistic products, that I used for making black powder shells,and it uses a power drill to roll the shell hull over a cardboard disk, which is the way that the olde time shells used to be crimped before star crimping. But you have to remove the star crimp before you can roll crimp. Just keep in mind, that a shell's length is rated as fully open. In other words, if you have a gun with a 2-3/4" chamber, the shell itself is really shorter than this after crimping. So for example, lets say that you want to roll crimp some shells for your gun that is chambered for 2-3/4" shells, and you are starting with 3" shells. You will have to cut them down to 2-3/4" over all length, and then roll crimp them. I know that the OP probably already knows this, so this is for the others that may not? If you get a gun that is chambered for 3.5", you do not have to worry, as you can shoot all length shells without any problems. But do not fire a long shell, such as a 3" shell, in a short chamber, as this can be very dangerous!

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  4. Actually you'll get no argument from me on the fact that resource depletion is a factor in the cost of goods overall.
    But as to the ammo shortage and brass, I might have reason to argue that point. In my trade I tend to accumulate a lot of scrap copper and brass. These scraps I resale at the scrap yards. Copper is at a high resale price of roughly $3.50 per pound whereas brass is only around $.50 cents. If brass were actually in shortage the scrap price would reflect this and it does not. Part of this does not make sense because brass is just a combination of copper and tin. One would think that with copper being so high in value it also should reflect in brass if the demand was high.
    Now at the retail end of things I still hear of a huge demand for 22 rimfire. My thoughts of this is because I still consider it to be the most sought after survival round. Primarily just because of value per round. Yes a larger rile round kills quicker, yet then again the 22 does the same thing just at a slower pace. If you are shot in the guts with a 22 after SHTF, you are going to die ! Period ! Most folks that are true survivalists know this fact and there fore the round is still in huge demand. The consumers are scarfing up every round being produced right along with the rest of the ammo supply.
    The publicity of the ammo shortage has created many new hoarders and until they've had their fill it will continue.
    Even though I've plenty of ammo in all calibers in my possession, when given the opportunity I buy even more. In this I'm not alone for certain. Let alone all those millions of new gun owners that just lately have decided they too need a stockpile. The frenzy is feeding itself and may not slow down for a while yet.
    Though all these Johnny come lately city boys buying up first time guns and hoarding ammo even to me is a scary thought. Country boy, knows his target and hits it. The city boys shoot at bushes and pray that they hit anything.
    That scares shit outta me !!

    Just my 2 cents worth on the subject

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    1. I hope you are right and in a year all the buyers are unemployed and I can buy more myself. I wonder if the scrap price is because pure copper smelt is less energy dependent that having to seperate in brass? Cost of seperation? I could be full of it. You wouldn't think labor alone is worth $3 a pound, but perhaps it is since it is becomming harder to economically ship to China.

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    2. Thing is if brass itself were in hard demand the scrap price should reflect this. Copper certainly is !
      According to all the reports I'm hearing on gun blogs etc. the demand is really showing no sign of decreasing and is predicted to last at least another year just to fill back orders. Sucks big time. Guess what we now have is pretty much the way it's going to be. Though I can show up at one of the WM here in town at 6 AM and wait in line. It usually will produce those three boxes of whatever came in. Just no guarantee that my type will show. Do know that when cases of 22 come in it all goes to the first 10 guys in line.

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  5. Not sure that I agree with you, but it still makes me think I might want to go buy another 1K rounds of something, anything that's still relatively inexpensive. You see, I never thought rimfire would be in short supply, so what do I know?

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    1. I've warned of the ore situation for years, and still didn't see rimfire disappearing as it was happening. I could have panic bought at $22 a brick but refused. Will it ever be that cheap again?

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    2. Still $20 at my Wal Mart, just gotta be at the head of the line when it comes in. It is one thing I'll say good about Wally World, they are not jacking the price at least.

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  6. The current Ammo crisis has absolutely nothing to do with .Gov purchases. It is solely a result of panic buying by Joe Sixpack.

    I learned my lesson the first time dear Leader was elected. There was an ammo shortage for about six months after his coronation.
    In the ensuing years I stockpiled for my needs and have not purchased since last summer. I give the situation about a year before ammo is reasonably available again.

    M1 Garands are still available from CMP for reasonable money. Not as cheap as the bolt actions in the past but still there and ammo is still around. $600 will get you a nice mil grade rifle. Something to consider.

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    1. I don't claim I'm 100% correct and everybody else is totally wrong. I'd love ammo to recover in a year. I'd gladly eat humble pie. I just think that we only know one paradigm- the lowest ore concentrations recovered by affordable energy. If that is done, so is new ore supply. Better to panic early in ALL things. Food ( drought ), ammo ( no ore ), cities collapsing ( Detroit ), etc.

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  7. "we are already in a collapse"
    Yep.
    No question, by almost every measure if you are not in the onepercent you are likely facing a worse situation now than you were just a decade ago, and a worse situation a decade ago than a decade before that. Things are getting worse.
    You personally might have a better job now than then, but your paycheck doesnt stretch much further.
    Electronics gizmos and entertainments might be cheaper (though prices seem mostly stagnant now). But food, energy, shelter, and any other consumable has increased in price.
    Your job is likely more precarious now than ever before, even government jobs are getting less secure.
    Ammo? If you dont have enough for the rest of your and your families life you dont have enough, better switch to the cheaper ramen noodles and get it, or start learning archery and slings.
    Personally I am doing both- eating less and cheaper to buy ammo, and starting to practice with the 'obsolete' weapons that will not be outlawed soon.
    -Grey

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    1. What a rip off anymore. Raman is now 20cent on sale, more regularly. Better switch to nuke bread.

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    2. You're not kidding Jame's. No more than 5 years back, it was around a nickel a pack on special. Now a 6 pack is around $3.00 in my area. Though sometimes you do still find specials, but nothing like the nickel a pack as before.

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  8. I'm fairly squared away on guns and ammo but only because I bought when everything was cheap. Those $15 .22 bricks are nice to have.

    At the price of ammo, I think I'll be sport shooting with black powder. Maybe it's time to practice home brewing some of that? Primers can be worked around.

    I know too many people with nice gun collections and no ammo to run down the pipe. They are now just fancy clubs.

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    1. If you can come up with a way to make primer material WITHOUT using safety matches, please share it with me. And remember what I said about the book "Caveman Chemistry". You can make guncotton with sulphur and nitrates. No need for BP IF the primers are not an issue.

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    2. Unfortunately sixbears, even black powder isn't all that cheap to shoot anymore? If you are shooting cap and ball revolvers, it's actually cheaper to get a cartridge conversion cylinder, and shoot smokeless (after the price of the conversion cylinder is offset of course).

      I figured that I could load around 930 rounds of .45 long colt, for my Ruger old army cartridge conversion, from one can of HP38. 7000/7.5 =933 rounds. 7000 grains of powder per one pound can. 7.5 grains of HP38 was around 850fps pushing a 200gr projectile if I recall correctly?

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    3. Primers Can be done. It is just some scary assed shit to mess with is all.

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    4. Yeah, didn't get into the details as there are enough fingerless blind people in the world.

      My bows are looking better every year.

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  9. Last year I got into black powder guns, they are not the fastest shooting guns on this rock but they have there good points. You can make gun powder and melt down the rich fucks gold and silver when you run out of lead.

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    1. How mant dental filling would be needed per bullet?

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  10. A lot of the folks in our black powder club use flintlocks, no need for primers.

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  11. And flintlock is great. For hunting. For defense, if possible you don't want to put yourself at that disadvantage.

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  12. Please don't hate me if I didn't directly respond to your comments in the last few hours. Such a popular topic, I got overwhelmed and ran out of time. Please keep commenting!

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  13. I'm thinking that modern smokeless powder can be used in black powder guns if you mix in extra carbon to slow the burn rate down. But what in the hell do I know.

    I have a thick wall piece of stainless tube that I'm making into a 50 caliber smooth bore hand canon, just for fun.

    HERE'S SOME GOOD FOLKS WITH FAIR PRICES. And they know their stuff.

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    1. NO modern in BP, BP in modern. The conventional advice. I wouldn't test it personally.

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    2. Yes; very dangerous, unless it's the one exception to the rule that I mentioned above @9;53am. Some info on this model below:

      http://www.chuckhawks.com/savage_ML_FAQ.htm

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  14. Anon, 316, the M1 Garand is the best rifle ever made. Get one, folks.

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    1. M-14 is my vote.

      And in answer to your way above question I have indeed made a sum total of three, yes that is 3, primers with matchsticks. I really just wanted to see if I could do it. They indeed fired off but it took me a total of 12 spent primers to finally remove the anvil without losing it and get the dimple out of the primer base and all put back together.

      It really SUCKED to do.

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    2. of course, all the improvised cookbooks make it sound easy. But at least we know the matchheads still work. Not that you'll find any around after everyone burns their furniture to stay warm. Isn't an HK clone cheaper than an M14?

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  15. I find it interesting that according to the law, as explained to me, that I can only be in possession of five pounds of black powder, but can have all the black powder substitute I want.

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    1. Obviously BP is a weapon of mass destruction.

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    2. Any explosive can be, we just have stupid law makers in this country.

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    3. After the Disney bombing, I'm still waiting for dry ice and soda bottles to be outlawed. It's for the children.

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