Friday, September 28, 2012

old guns and buried foods

OLD GUNS AND BURIED FOOD
Today, should you still buy war surplus guns and burying food for extra storage space.  Now, keep in mind that these were either questions asked by minions or my response therein, so if you don’t like today’s article theme you can blame them as well as commence kissing my ass.  The last two weeks have seen an overabundance of above average articles, at least in my extremely humble opinion.  Some weeks you have to suffer four mediocre articles to get to the one brilliant wonderful insightful wise and illuminating article.  I think I reversed that the last two weeks.  But keep in mind that I’ve also been alone more than usual at work due to the boss going on vacation and the volunteers taking over her job.  I’ve had less distractions to pondering what I was planning on writing about.  That is ending today, so don’t plan on subjects that are above even my high standards too often.  I wonder if that was why it started to get so hard to come up with sheer brilliance with the last blog.  I had less peace and quiet before lunch ( I used to do everything myself in the food bank, now I have a boss and a lot of volunteers ).  Everything has a price, even free stuff.
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A minion wished to know if it was still worth buying war surplus guns, in commenting on my article on items no longer available cheaply.  Here’s the thing.  With war surplus, you were buying beat up old junk.  When the price was right, say $75, you only focused on the good such as premium built, a wicked cool bayonet ( which was also very practical considering the end of ammo after the apocalypse ), high powered ammo, able to withstand muddy wartime dirty conditions.  But once the price went up, the negatives started to pile up.  In some cases it cost more than the gun to install a scope.  The rifling and muzzle had serious wear conditions in some cases.  Encased in wood, the barrel had to be free floated or your aim would suffer.  You had one of two choices- it could be accurate or it could stand up to dirty field conditions ( still the case today, however, so this one might not count ).  You had to do your research because some nations churned out real crap ( the Mauser was in general wonderful, but some countries screwed those up such as Turkey ).  The ammo was cheap as long as surplus stockpiles were available but after that the commercial stuff was real pricey.  Today, the only gun available where the cheap price offsets the liabilities is the Russian bolt.  Everything else is all disadvantages with only two advantages- a bayonet and rugged construction.  In my opinion, it isn’t worth buying them anymore.  A new bolt action is not as rugged, and it certainly has no bayonet, but they are affordable ( $275 ), their ammo is about as cheap as it gets, they come from the factory scope ready ( well, scope mount ready ).  As a side note, with scopes I only recommend the cheap units.  A three hundred dollar scope, when ( when, not if ) it breaks, you now have no glass on your rifle.  If you buy $30 scopes, you buy five for back-ups and it costs half as much.  Use the sight as a tool, not as a substitute for practice or skill.  Unless you are a true sniper, you don’t need expensive scopes.
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A minion thought he was being pretty clever when he admonished me ( okay, he was pretty nice about it, but I image he thought he was going to zing me- not to worry, it’s all in good fun ) for recommending massive wheat stockpiles.  I was in the desert with several acres, and my poor long suffering minions were stuck in some Yankee craphole or vast sprawling urban wasteland and couldn’t dig multiple underground caches.  My simple answer to that was to use your backyard to bury years worth of wheat.  Plus, you can always do the regular home thing and put them under the bed and at the bottom of closets and what-not.  I’m sure a few of you grasped your lower backs and sucked in hissing lungful’s of air, whining about how you couldn’t dig the compost out of a flower pot.  Others might have rolled your eyes and thought that it would be a cold day in Hell indeed before your wife allowed you to dig up the lawn.  Fine, I get it.  I’m supposed to think about everything around here.  One way that has been suggested by others is to use your rototiller and let the machine do the work a few inches at a time.  Then, you merely scoop up the dirt and you don’t need a pickax to break up the soil.  You could just use the edges where the flowers are.  The soil is already loose and moist.  Remove the plants, dig deeper ( enough to allow the roots some freedom ), place the buckets in and put the soil and plants back.  As far as the lawn, can’t you just remove in blocks and re-sod?
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Are you saying I’m the only one to ever consider this?  I doubt it.  Just be careful, as the neighbors will both narc on you about the food later, and now they might report you if they think you are burying drugs or gold or guns.  Oh, the law dawgs might inform the neighbor no law is being broken ( except with drugs ), but you can bet the report is filed to Homeland Security and will be duly noted.  I bury my buckets without Mylar liners, but I doubt your climate is that forgiving.  You’ll have a lot more moisture and bugs.  It might be more expensive, but then this is a once in a lifetime food purchase.  Wheat doesn’t stay good “only” twenty years.  It last almost forever buried.  I’ve noticed once again that Wal-Mart is offering cheaper buckets ( for awhile they were marked six bucks or so ).  These are from the manufacture I contacted and found out they were food grade ( still no guarantee but better than guessing or going with orange Home Depot buckets ).  The article was one of the first over at Bison Survival Blog if you want to re-read it.  By burying, you can go from six months food per family to three years per.  A much better peace of mind stash.
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7 comments:

  1. I'm wondering what happened to all the SKS's. Every gun show used to have many racks of them 20 years ago for $99. Now I rarely see one at any price. Maybe three in the last two years.

    Did they all get hoarded and buried by survivalists? You would think you would still see many of them, even if the price is $400, but no, they just aren't out there for sale. Strange.

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  2. I just saw wheat at the local Walmart (ohio) for the first time ever. It was almost $14 for a 25lb bag. I thought that was pretty steep. Am I wrong? They only had 2 bags.

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    1. That's what it is here. I would say only buy their kernals if there is no other way to get them. Or you only needed a little, such as if you stored rice and beans and just needed a few bags of wheat for sprouts. In cost comparrison, my feed store, overpriced compared to most parts, has 50 lb bags for $15.

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    2. I had forgotten about sprouting. I used to put them on a salad when we went to Golden Corral.

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  3. Never say die
    http://tinyurl.com/295e9gz
    Grandpa survivalist Apr 2010 concerns those over 70. I am 80 this month, walk with a cane, use a walker at flea markets and gun shows, can climb stairs only if there is handrail to pull on, and had a ramp installed at the door. I urge you to buy canes, crutches and walkers at flea markets for your own future use and for others you care about. Last night in the rain I fell, crawled to my suburban, pulled on bumper and door handle to stand. Every day I do rowing exercise with 50 lb each hand, and 4 x 50 pushups with my hands on kitchen sink. There are no free lunches. If you are too lazy to exercize you lose strength. If you fall, and there is noone to help you may die. So be it.

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  4. Here's a thought for the nosy neighbors: plant a "tree" in the hole which is actually just a freshly cut branch you've stuck in a pot. Go through the motions of watering it and such and pretend to be upset when it "dies". Oh yeah but don't do this with willow or you may be unhappily successful.

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  5. Also, beware of the ground penetrating radar! There are tricks to avoid detection. Kurt Saxon offered a few. Look it up.

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