Wednesday, April 16, 2014

bug out book

Okay, I’ll be the first to admit that the new weekly format is leaving a bit to be desired.  Yet fear not gentle minions, I am merely in stand-by mode.  I’ll be getting to better things soon enough.  I just got back from vacation at the folks, and that always disrupts the writing schedule.  So please keep checking back every Wednesday and if I happen to have a bare minimum article, don’t think it is going to be the new norm.  Also, please excuse yesterday’s lack of attention to the comments.  The work computer is out of commission so I had to use mine to get online.  Not only is wireless slower than a liquid cat turd on a cold tin roof, Blogger wasn’t recognizing my five year old version of the browser- so I spent most of my time figuring that out plus downloading another one.  It’s a darn good thing you aren’t paying to read my bleetings, yes?
SWBABOB
ANOTHER BUG OUT BOOK
No18part3

Sheltering Underground, continued
I normally don’t get claustrophobic.   I panic easily if too many people press in too close to me because I know as sure as God made little green sour apples ( contrary to fables such as George Burns “Oh, God” which stipulates poor choices such as avocado pits, I like to think that any and all mistakes were made by subcontractors who finished up random loose ends around midnight Saturday during the creation ) that each and every swinging dingus out there wants to get into my personal space and inflict grave bodily harm upon me.  But that is just common sense.  I can understand the feeling of being confined, but also have a hard time understanding how many of us suffer from it when we also commute for long periods of time in a very small enclosed box of sheet metal.  Selective claustrophobia, perhaps?  Anyway, this is obviously a small consideration ( just as gluten intolerance is for a small minority if you are wondering what to stockpile for apocalypse food ) that I’ll assume doesn’t apply to most of us and go from there.  You obviously need the space you shall dig to be more than coffin size- I think almost anyone would freak out with that- but you also don’t need an underground base.  Dig one pit/shelter for a sleeping hut and another for storing all your supplies.
*
If you plan on using standard lumber, a shelter measuring four by eight is both enough room to live in ( we are talking about a rigid underground tent size here, remember ) and will hold a lot of supplies.  It also minimizes construction cost and effort.  The one advantage for these kinds of shelters I have in the desert is lack of water.  I need no shoring or concrete other than corner posts.  For those in wetter climes, refer to the book “The $50 & Up Underground Home”.  But you are only building four feet high and hence, this being a mound, you don’t need to dig down too far.  Plastic over the top, and a nice drainage ditch all around diverting water flow away and down should work out well for most ( of course, while this is being hidden, you obviously can‘t have the ditch.  You can add those after you move in. In the meantime, stretch extra plastic far away from the sides and try to build on a naturally higher area ).  If you dig down three feet and use the discard dirt as the last foot- building the hole up even as you dig down- you will still have a hard job ahead of you but not impossible.  You are digging a six by ten hole, three foot down.  The shelter itself, disregarding any shoring needed- is not much more than five sheets of plywood and around forty or so sticks of pine.  Roughly $200 after buying a roll of plastic ( so, the second storage structure costs a round $150 ).  This is assuming store bought new materials.  This compares favorably to a $250,000 concrete mountaintop retreat.
*
SBJABOBno19
ANOTHER BUG OUT BOOK
Tool Stash

A viable alternative to pre-building a shelter on site is to merely stash the tools needed to build after your arrival.  Now, obviously, this depends on several factors.  Your natural terrain will determine a lot of this.  If you are in the middle of a forest you have an abundance of building material.  Not so much in the desert ( timber for roofing if nothing else being a limiting factor ).  And, let’s not forget that all import climate factor.  If you are bugging out in the northern tier of the country, you certainly don’t want to be trying to build a shelter in the middle of the winter.  And of course, security.  You won’t be using a chainsaw, backhoe or power saw, but you will still attract some kind of attention even building with manual tools.  You want to keep all of these things in mind while deciding if this is for you, stashing tools.  But the advantages are that this is the easiest method to use if you are bugging out to a property you plan on squatting at which would be illegal under current conditions.  At the most, you need to smuggle in and hide just a few items.  None of them all that bulky or noticeable if sufficient precautions are taken. 
*
You won’t need too much more than a saw and ax, a hammer and plenty of nails, plastic sheeting and a shovel and pick.  I wouldn’t advise building a full blown log cabin- that is a bit beyond simple tools and can be dangerous.  Smaller trees  will work just fine.  Do a little research on Native American shelters.  I initially thought that small panes of glass would be needed.  Natural sunlight is far better than trying to keep in artificial illumination, and unless you arte going totally Ninja Concealment, you really need to have some light coming in to preserve your sanity.  Instead, I’d think about just using the same plastic sheeting you are using on the roof.  It won’t last all that long, but it is easily replaceable and you shouldn’t be using this shelter indefinitely.  In the future, after you’ve moved to a better location or enlarged your hovel into a three sided earth sheltered cabin, you can go find some windows during scavenging.  If you can transport small pieces of glass- say, car side windows you trash pick- great.  One less thing to worry about later.  But the goal here is to minimize what you must pre-stash.  You can also substitute nails with cordage or synthetic rope, such as clothesline they most likely still sell at the dollar store.  That should drastically cut down on the weight and cost.  Simplicity has rewards all its own.
END



The Old Bison Blog on CD
Over five years of work and nearly two million words of pure brilliance. Here is the link to order:
http://kunaki.com/sales.asp?PID=PX00KX7Z1I
*
Please support Bison by buying through the Amazon ad graphics at the top of the page. You can purchase anything, not just the linked item. Enter Amazon through my item link and then go to whatever other item you desire. As long as you don’t leave Amazon until after the order is placed, I get credit for your purchase.  For those that can’t get the ads because they are blocked by your software, just PayPal me occasionally or buy me something from my Amazon Wish List once a year.
*

My books available on thumb drive:



Homesteading For $3k Book, Top 20 Survivalist Fiction, Land In Elko, Blog Book, Lord Bison
*
If my Blogger page ever goes down, I will start to post at my regular web site:
www.BisonPress.com
*
My books on PDF available at
http://www.lulu.com/shop/search.ep?keyWords=james++dakin&sorter=relevance-desc
*
By the by, all my writing is copyrighted. For the obtuse out there.

Saturday, April 12, 2014

guest article

GUEST ARTICLE

Gadgets and Gizmos: Shotgun Inserts

Amazon chamber insert

Shotgun inserts

Here is one item that all serious survivalists and preppers have to have. It's a chamber insert that allows you to shoot 20 gauge shells in your 12 gauge.

It's been almost six months since the grid went down. You and just about everyone else in your group, and in those groups around you, are just about out of 12 gauge shells. The supply of 20 gauge shells have held up pretty good. Drop one of these in your single shot or double barrel. Now you have a working shotgun again.

OR

Harry's group (half a mile away) is just about out of 12 ga. shells. They still have lots of 20s though. They also have the only flock of laying hens around, for more than seven miles. Sure would be nice to have some of your own layers. Maybe they would be interested in a trade.

Use your imagination, you will be able to thinks of lots of reasons to have a chamber insert.

They are available for all the shotgun sizes.

They are also available for shooting 9mm in your 12 gauge (one of many choices.) I think the chamber inserts for shotgun gauges are smart. The choices for using pistol and rifle cartridges in your shotgun, probably are not worth it. Aiming and accuracy would be problems.

The insert you see above is available for about 30 bucks from amazon.

Friday, April 11, 2014

guest article

GUEST ARTICLE

If only....& A ?

I want to get your mind into a certain mood or frame of mind.

If only I had bought cases and cases of 223 and 7.62x39 from cheaperthandirt when they were selling them for $74/1000 with free delivery....

If only I had bought 10 SKS's when they were selling for $59 each...

If only I had bought silver at $5 an ounce and gold at $250....

If only I had bought AK clones when they sold for $179....

If only I had bought 8mm rounds when they were going for 6 cents...

If only I had bought cases of 7.62x25 when the price was 4 cents a round.....

If only I had invested in oil when it was $8 a barrel....

If only I had bought 20 fifty pound bags of rice from Sam's club when it was only $20 a bag... Oh! WAIT! I still can buy those!

Don't short yourself on food. You probably won't be in a firefight everyday, but it sure is nice to eat everyday.

Don't wait!

How many have looked back and regretted not stocking up more on ammo when it was plentiful and cheap? Don't let yourself have those regrets concerning food.


A (nother) Question

Thanks everyone for all the opinions on the last question. It was interesting to see how others are thinking. I'm sorry that it was not a contest with a prize. (A good idea for a future post)

OK. Here's the question... What three important things do you think the great majority of survivalist/preppers forget to stock?

Thursday, April 10, 2014

guest article

GUEST ARTICLE
Survival Air Rifles: Follow up on the Shanghai B1 Air Rifle

I received the Shanghai B1 this last Thursday.

The gun arrived in good shape cosmetically. It had a nice finish on the wood stock, and the metal parts were nicely blued, and of durable construction. The steel barrel was nicely rifled. The gun is somewhat short, and is light weight at 5.5lbs. For $30.00 (Really $50.00 after shipping and tax) this is a very nice gun!

Out of the box, the gun was pretty much sighted in, with the windage being perfect. At about 20 metres (60ft) I had to aim a little low to hit a beverage can that I was shooting at. Shot placement was pretty consistent, providing that I performed my part well. The sights were close enough on arrival, that I didn't even bother trying to adjust them further. The gun is also pretty quiet, unlike many of the super air guns with their all telling supersonic crack. This little gun is a very nice shooter for the price.

It was mentioned by many reviewers, that the chinese pellets that the gun shipped with, were the only ones that would fit the gun. The other industry standard pellets were too large, and that it was necessary to slightly ream the breech so that other brands of pellets would load. I did find that the pellets that the gun came with were easier to slip into the bore, but that my Crossman premium grade pellets fit just fine, so no problems with my particular gun. The gun was pretty easy to cock as well. The sights are constructed of all metal, and are of surprisingly good quality considering the price of the gun. The rear sight has an elevation setting (No windage) and the front sight is a military style hooded design, with a simple post for a front sight. It is wedged into the barrel, so that if the windage were to be off, an adjustment would be possible with a small hammer and tap.

Now for the bad. This air rifle lacks the velocity to be used as a serious hunting gun, and so I couldn't recommend it for this purpose. One reviewer mentioned that his B1 went through about a half inch of pine. I didn't have any pine, but I did have some 1/2” plywood, and my gun would only bury the pellet flush into the wood. I suppose that this would provide enough power to take small game, but only at close ranges with a very well placed shot, such as a head or neck shot. The trigger pull on this gun is very heavy; I would guess around 10lbs? So this creates a challenge when it comes to very accurate shooting. I do not know what kind of performance upgrade one can expect from tuning the gun? But I would not expect a significant increase in velocity? I do think that the trigger pull would benefit from polishing and reworking the trigger assembly, so I would plan on a trigger modification should you get one of these rifles.

A few words of warning should you purchase one of these guns. There is no safety. Also, as many others have mentioned, keep your hands away from the trigger when cocking and loading. A situation exists where it would be easy to slam the barrel on your finger, causing some serious injury resulting in the possible loss of ones valued digits! When I loaded mine, I held the barrel with one hand, while loading the pellet into the breech with the other. I would recommend the same procedure with the B3; that is, hold the cocking lever with one hand, while loading the pellet into the breech with the other.

Despite any imperfections or flaws that one would expect for such a low priced Air Gun, I do not regret the purchase at all, and will keep this gun as a backup. I think that I am going to give the B3 a try next? The B3 with its extra 200fps+ might just be enough to give it the extra edge needed for hunting? So knowing what I know now, if you are wanting to try one of these guns out, I would have to recommend the more powerful B3 to start. If you only want a plinker, and back up emergency rifle, then the B1 will suffice, but in my opinion, it's better to have the more powerful B3 gun that can serve both purposes well. Due to the B3 having a stationary barrel, (As opposed to the B1 with its cocking barrel) I would feel more confident mounting a scope on this model, should I wish to do so at some point.

The Shanghai air rifles are very nice guns for the price, and as long as you do not expect high end air rifle performance from these low priced guns, then I think that you will be pleased with them. Life expectancy remains to seen? But I will report back any incidents in this area as they arise.

If I ever get around to tuning this B1 (Likely at some point) or if I do end up upgrading to the B3 (Also likely) I will provide an update.

Wednesday, April 9, 2014

trailer relocation 2

TRAILER RELOCATION 2

Before we get to today’s topic, a short detour. Okay, first off, I’ve never gotten my grubby little paws on a tactical sling. I’ve never seen close up pictures of them either. I’m winging it of spit and prayers here, so if it makes you feel better think of this as opening a discussion with those more experienced instead of me preaching or teaching. If I’m not totally showing my ass here, a tac sling holds your rifle in front and right side up and makes bringing the thing into position much easier and quicker. Re-inventing the wheel, I saw a “utility strap” in the dollar store, two straps for a buck and six feet long each. This are used to cinch together a stack of boxes or bags and easily carry them with one hand. I figured it was a cheap and easy experiment.

*

The plastic clip holding the two halves together was flimsy, so I didn’t want any strain on that piece. I slipped the loop into the buttstock sling ring ( I’m trying to dredge up ancient remembrances of parts nomenclature here so bear with me as I use “thingamajig” and “whatsyamacallit” ) and tightly stretched the excess strap to the hand-grip part of the stock, wrapped it around several times and then tied the excess strap loop pointing up. Slipping the loop strap over my head and under my right arm, the butt plate of the rifle hung about six inches from my throat. I was able to easily and quickly shoulder and site the rifle and the strap did not hinder my grip. Now, I won’t say this was comfortable as it is basically a ten pound dumbbell on a necklace. But for short periods, patrol or perimeter duty, it might be feasible. And it was under a buck.

*

Back to trailer relocation. I can already hear you protesting. But, if I’m renting a small lot I can’t grow twenty three bushels of asparagus to eat on after the collapse. I can’t have my own firing range to test out my arsenal of plastic black carbines, nor do I have a place to stockpile one hundred cases of MRE’s. You can never afford a Yuppie Survivalist Mountaintop Concrete Bunker, yet you won’t leave your dead end job in the metroplex area, commuting two hours a day from suburbia, because all you have read about survivalism preaches twenty acres in the wilderness and battalion size arsenals. You won’t compromise, which is a nice addiction to perfectionism and not incidentally allows you to do nothing at all.

*

Modern farmed grains are a miracle you are stupid to ignore. Just as you can’t NOT rely on modern firearms and irreplaceable ammunition, you are better off stockpiling grains even if they can’t be replaced. In what other fantasy can you have enough calories to live on for a year, with only two and a half days working a minimum wage job ( only two if you don’t calculate storage container cost )? Compared to buying a farm, buying grains are tailor made for poor people. Stocking ten years worth is less than a years property taxes on even a small farm. Rent yourself a storage shed close to your rented trailer spot and even if it isn’t all that cheap, you now have food storage even for the smallest trailer. It isn’t perfect, elegant or long term, but it will do for now and is far better than nothing.

*

I’m not sure were the notion that only perfection must be sought after ( although we are all guilty at one time or another. Only lusting after Playboy quality gals, or Harlequin romance hunks as the case may be . Not wanting to be armed with anything other than the perfect weapon. Not willing to work at a “lesser” job ). A lot of that has social status baked into it. Which is why I tend to harp on that a bit- if you can see why you are doing something, sometimes it shows you that the action is suboptimal. If you can lower your sites to a decreasing rung on the socioeconomic ladder you can sometimes find happiness. Or surprisingly simple answers to otherwise confusing puzzles. For instance, I know that your typical gal equates your job with your worthiness. It doesn’t matter what you owe, what you own, it is all a matter of status. Since an assistant manager in retail is the minimum prerequisite for attracting the lowest level employed female, the probabilities are good that unless I’m attracted to a incurable drunk or drug user I’ll never again have a relationship. Unless one can smell out success if my writing starts getting a serious paycheck. Which isn’t very likely in an imploding economy. This insight will keep me from foolishly seeking online dates or other silliness.

*

Okay, a bit off topic there, although I’m sure it all fits together somehow. Ignoring Yuppie Survival advice, advice that is only feasible in a growing economy, and having a willingness to accept lower order solutions, however imperfect they be, is your road towards survivalist happiness. You want a quick and cheap solution to relocating, there you have it. Whether you have the gumption to pay the non-monetary price is a different matter. I still say it is better to go with junk land, but I’ll also admit that reduces your options. Renting both a spot to park a trailer and a storage area sets you up for eventual failure, but there are other solutions than simply owning or being homeless. It is risky, but if your area isn’t too god awful crowded you can squat on public land after everyone else is doing the same. Or perhaps then a buddy down the road will be willing to “rent” you a parking spot paid for in storage food. “Experts” don’t always have the best solutions. In part because they are protecting their economic interests, not just yours.

END

The Old Bison Blog on CD
Over five years of work and nearly two million words of pure brilliance. Here is the link to order:
http://kunaki.com/sales.asp?PID=PX00KX7Z1I
*
Please support Bison by buying through the Amazon ad graphics at the top of the page. You can purchase anything, not just the linked item. Enter Amazon through my item link and then go to whatever other item you desire. As long as you don’t leave Amazon until after the order is placed, I get credit for your purchase.  For those that can’t get the ads because they are blocked by your software, just PayPal me occasionally or buy me something from my Amazon Wish List once a year.
*

My books available on thumb drive:



Homesteading For $3k Book, Top 20 Survivalist Fiction, Land In Elko, Blog Book, Lord Bison
*
If my Blogger page ever goes down, I will start to post at my regular web site:
www.BisonPress.com
*
My books on PDF available at
http://www.lulu.com/shop/search.ep?keyWords=james++dakin&sorter=relevance-desc
*
By the by, all my writing is copyrighted. For the obtuse out there.

Tuesday, April 8, 2014

shedule change

SHEDULE CHANGE

Yes, my dear long suffering loyal minions, yet another schedule change. I’m going to once a week, my previous plan to cut back for just one month morphing. Here is my reasoning. I’m really, honest Injun this time, running out of content. This has been nothing new. Way back during the newsletter over ten years ago I had issues with coming up with new material. A mere six years ago only a hundred articles into the blog I thought I was done coming up with anything more to say. Back when we went from one thousand words an article and cut it in half to five hundred a day, it was because I needed to go from earth shattering lengthy topics to more mundane topics that didn’t need much explanation ( how much can you say about, say, lanyards? ). Yet now even those have been exhausted.

*

I really think I’ve run my course after about 2400 articles ( many of which were repeats ). I can’t remember the last time I’ve had a new topic that was exciting and fresh. Oh, here and there I’ve responded to another blog’s article and refuted an idea that was yet another stale foundation rock of Yuppie Scum Survivalism. But those have been few and far between. Now, I’m not promising this is going to change. I’ll still strive for something, anything, newly amazing. But I think the odds are against it. No, the change to once a week is nothing more than a frantic grab at trying to keep my sanity from eroding faster. I’m still going to pursue the fiction. It used to be writing calmed my soul, soothed my stress levels. Because the writing has gone from a creative effort to a pathetic scramble to fill a blank page, not so much any more. I’m hoping the fiction will bring that back. So, again, thanks for being loyal, those that always have been. Adios to all my fair weather minions. Stay tuned Wednesdays for my efforts, and every other day or so check in for guest articles while they last.

END

The Old Bison Blog on CD
Over five years of work and nearly two million words of pure brilliance. Here is the link to order:
http://kunaki.com/sales.asp?PID=PX00KX7Z1I
*
Please support Bison by buying through the Amazon ad graphics at the top of the page. You can purchase anything, not just the linked item. Enter Amazon through my item link and then go to whatever other item you desire. As long as you don’t leave Amazon until after the order is placed, I get credit for your purchase.  For those that can’t get the ads because they are blocked by your software, just PayPal me occasionally or buy me something from my Amazon Wish List once a year.
*

My books available on thumb drive:



Homesteading For $3k Book, Top 20 Survivalist Fiction, Land In Elko, Blog Book, Lord Bison
*
If my Blogger page ever goes down, I will start to post at my regular web site:
www.BisonPress.com
*
My books on PDF available at
http://www.lulu.com/shop/search.ep?keyWords=james++dakin&sorter=relevance-desc
*
By the by, all my writing is copyrighted. For the obtuse out there.

Monday, April 7, 2014

trailer relocation

TRAILER RELOCATION

Yes, same old subject covered yet again. But hopefully I spaced those apart by six to twelve months so it doesn’t seem like “American Survival Guide” repetition where every single issue followed the same format of an extremely overpriced semi auto none of us would ever own, various filler of no remembrance and the inevitable cold weather survival article- the ads were cool though and almost always paid for the purchase price ( I wonder, are there any minions who would be interested in a collaboration on a survivalist magazine? Perhaps we could do something different. I was thinking undercutting everyone on ad prices to make it like Shotgun News, and offered on CD to stand out from the Kindle crowd. I’d provide a lot of the content but would need some help, plus I have no interest in the admin part of it ). Also, before we get to today’s article, a short subject. Canned bacon. I encountered bacon jerky a short time ago. To me, it tasted just like the pre-cooked bacon they offer outside the fridge. Perhaps a smidge less fatty. I wonder how feasible it would be to take the pre-cooked type and Mason jar it ( using the vacuum sealer jar attachment to suck all the air out ). Just delicious food for thought.

*

We have just been talking about relocating if something bad happens like eminent domain, over-population or the fracking companies moving to your locale. Understandably it would ideal to own your own land. But so many places are priced out of your league or have zoning prohibiting you from frugal living in a blatant attempt to keep out the poor, maximize local government revenue and pay back campaign contributors by monopolizing most services except oxygen supply ( and that is coming soon, Obammy’s Air Tax ). While it is far better to not owe the landlord, or the bank, if you are stuck beyond that possibility you can always do the next cheapest thing and rent a travel trailer/RV lot in town. This is ideal in so far as it minimizes your monthly rent, minimizes your moving costs and places almost no restrictions on where you can move to. For instance, if you think Idaho is ideal ( I’m saying it is, just giving a for instance ), you would find it near impossible to find an affordable piece of land close enough to a job to be feasible. So just pick a small town anywhere there is work and tow your trailer in a hook up. During a crash, paying rent is stupid. But wouldn’t it be far worse stuck paying rent in a much bigger city? You aren’t embracing the ideal, merely minimizing The Suck. Then, you always have the option of towing to a lot you eventually buy and can postpone building until you have cash on hand. Just an option, not a recommendation over junk land.

END


The Old Bison Blog on CD
Over five years of work and nearly two million words of pure brilliance. Here is the link to order:
http://kunaki.com/sales.asp?PID=PX00KX7Z1I
*
Please support Bison by buying through the Amazon ad graphics at the top of the page. You can purchase anything, not just the linked item. Enter Amazon through my item link and then go to whatever other item you desire. As long as you don’t leave Amazon until after the order is placed, I get credit for your purchase.  For those that can’t get the ads because they are blocked by your software, just PayPal me occasionally or buy me something from my Amazon Wish List once a year.
*

My books available on thumb drive:



Homesteading For $3k Book, Top 20 Survivalist Fiction, Land In Elko, Blog Book, Lord Bison
*
If my Blogger page ever goes down, I will start to post at my regular web site:
www.BisonPress.com
*
My books on PDF available at
http://www.lulu.com/shop/search.ep?keyWords=james++dakin&sorter=relevance-desc
*
By the by, all my writing is copyrighted. For the obtuse out there.